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How to get the best out of your ebook: 7 Tips for Self-publishing & Promotion

After learning and gaining experiences through the creation of the two Europeana Food and Drink book products, London Local Pubs: Past and Present and the eCookbook Tasting Historical Europe – Exploring the culinary threads between Austria and Lithuania, we asked our cluster partners to share these lessons with us. This blogpost is part three of our series on the development of the London Local Pubs: Past and Present ebook.

Promoting books and ebooks can be tricky, as many different solutions are available in  the market today. Because of information flood, it is important to be sure that your message is delivered to the proper key person, professionally and in a convincing way.

Photographs by Cath Harries.
London Local Pubs Launch Event at Magpie & Stump (Photographs by Cath Harries)

Here is a summary selection of some hints to consider when a self publisher wants to promote his/her own book and ebook. These hints are derived from the research done by Andrea de Polo from Fratelli Alinari as part of the publication of the London Local Pubs book and ebook.

1. If possible, provide a Kindle version of the book. Amazon is one of the main platforms for the sale of ebooks and they predominantly sell Kindle-compatible ebooks.

2. Use professional DTP (desktop publishing) software and if needed, find a dedicated and proficient writer for the book and ebook.

3. Make sure you design the website similar to the book, with an option and/or link to purchase and download.

4. Organize a local kickoff event to launch the publication: be sure to invite local key people, contributors, journalists or blogger. For London Local Pubs: Past and Present, the launch was celebrated at The Magpie & Stump in central London, one of the pubs featured in the book, bringing together over 100 people from across the pub, beer and brewing world, including many of the licensees and regulars who contributed their stories and memories to the book.

5. In launch period, create an online buzz on your main social media platforms. Try to engage your audience in different ways, such as inviting people to participate in an online“Tweet-up” event with a dedicated hashtag (See #52Pubs) or have giveaways such as a sample chapter.

6. Use your social networks the right way: Avoid spam and mass mails, instead create targeted and personalized emails to influencers in your field. Write blogs and news for writers and authors with meaningful objectives related to the topic and worthwhile for your target audience to subscribe to. This can be teaser posts using information from the book, which might want the reader to get the full book

7. Use radio and traditional media too to communicate about the launch of the product. Be sure to do so before the product enters the market, so you can generate anticipation for it.

What are your number one methods for promoting your ebook?  We learned that most important, these promotion tactics need to be tailored to your product and to what works best for the topic and target audience of your ebook.

 

Check out London Local Pubs: Past and Present, available for purchase here or download our free eCookbook on the historic connection of Austrian and Lithuanian cuisine.

 

By Andrea de Polo, Fratelli Alinari and Angelika Leitner, Austrian National Library

The books have been made possible by the Europeana Food and Drink project, funded by the European Union. The London Local Pubs: Past and Present ebook has been published by Halsgrove Publishing with assistance from the National Brewery Heritage Trust, Historypin, Federation of European Publishers, Fratelli Alinari, Topfoto and Keepthinking. The eCookbook Tasting Historical Europe – Exploring the culinary threads between Austria and Lithuania  was developed by project partners Vilnius University – Faculty of Communication and Austrian National Library.

 

Reuse of digital cultural heritage through the eyes of ‘traditional’ publishing

As part two of our blogpost series on the London Local Pubs: Past and Present ebook, Enrico Turrin of FEP is giving us some insight into ebooks and the reuse of digital cultural heritage through the eyes of ‘traditional’ publishing.

Publishing & Europe’s food and drink heritage

As the Federation of European Publishers (FEP), we got involved in the Europeana Food and Drink project as representatives of the book publishing sector, in order to contribute with our knowledge and experience about book publishing and to act as a contact with publishers from all over Europe. After all, one of the expected outcomes of the project was the publication of a book and an ebook!

At the same time, we thought the project would yield results that were interesting for publishers: a large library of high quality digital objects from many museums, archives and other cultural institutions across Europe, related to a trendy and fascinating topic like our food and drink culture, and available for commercial reuse.

The publication of the book London Local Pubs: Past and Present was the first, very tangible result of the collaboration of several project partners, and a good one, at that. Available in both print and digital, the book embodies the spirit of Europeana Food and Drink: it focuses on a traditional aspect of the food and (especially) drink culture, with an eye to history and one to modern times, using a wealth of beautiful images from past and present.

eBookpostFEP
Morris Dancers passing the Magpie & Stump; The Queen’s Head between 1930 and 1960
Book or eBook?

We think that these kinds of publications, on similar topics and with such interesting source materials, are very well suited for different formats, print and digital. On one hand, beautiful pictures make for nice illustrated books that figure well on your bookshelf or coffee table. On the other hand, the topic of food and drink is great for cookbooks and travel guides and many other publications that can be greatly enhanced by the features of digital books: easy to carry, enhanced, interactive, etc.

We are therefore promoting Europeana Food and Drink among our constituency, the book publishing sector, hoping to see this experience replicated many times. Besides regularly updating our members (28 national associations of book publishers from all over Europe), we have organised presentations about the project and its content base at the Frankfurt Book Fair with a dedicated area for the food and drink topic, called Gourmet Gallery and the London Book Fair just this week.

collage_London Book Fair
Enrico Turrin, FEP at London Book Fair, 12th April 2016

To make sure that the content made available through Europeana Food and Drink can express its full potential in terms of commercial reuse, we recommend that it is made easily searchable, and made available at very clear conditions.

By Enrico Turrin, Federation of European Publishers

 

The London Local Pubs: Past and Present ebook has been published by Halsgrove Publishing as part of the Europeana Food and Drink project, with assistance from the National Brewery Heritage Trust, Historypin, Federation of European Publishers, Fratelli Alinari, Topfoto and Keepthinking.

London Local Pubs: Past and Present — the ebook edition

Today we shine the spotlight on the London Local Pubs: Past and Present ebook, one of the Europeana Food and Drink products. The portable format of this publication makes it the perfect companion for visiting London to enjoy the traditional British pubs, or for discovering them from the comfort of your own home. It is available for purchase here.

The ebook tells the stories of 52 pubs in and around London through stunning historical photographs and memories shared by pub landlords and regulars. It includes a map and address details for each pub, so it is easy to visit and experience them for yourself.

London Local Pubs - Past and Present eBook edition

 

In the ebook, each historical image contains a link to Europeana.eu, where you can find more information about the photograph. There is also a link to Historypin.org for every pub, so you can contribute your own pictures and memories to the growing archive of stories there.

London Local Pubs: Past and Present is written by Adrian Tierney-Jones, a pub and beer writer from the United Kingdom. He has drawn together all stories and anecdotes about each pub into rich, evocative descriptions, such as the one about the Newman Arms below.

“Here we are in Fitzrovia with Dylan Thomas cadging a drink and offering some words on a scrap of paper as payment. Or maybe it’s George Orwell, silent in the corner, mulling over his pint, observing and seeing all (he used the Newman Arms as a model for the proles’ pub in 1984; it also appeared in Keep The Aspidistra Flying). Other picaresque characters, whose novels, poems and paintings failed to move further than the table, have also come and gone through the doors of the Newman Arms since the 1940s, when this close-knit grid of streets first developed its racy, bohemian reputation.”

 

London Local Pubs - Past and Present eBook edition

If you want to explore the pubs in a different way, why not visit museums.eu/trails and follow one of the pub trails there? All 3414 photographs from the Charrington collection, which form the basis of the ebook, are also available to browse on Europeana.eu here.

This blogpost is the first in a series in the development of the London Local Pubs: Past and Present ebook. The next installment, written by Enrico Turrin of FEP, gives some insight into ebooks and the reuse of digital cultural heritage through the eyes of ‘traditional’ publishing.

 

The London Local Pubs: Past and Present ebook has been published by Halsgrove Publishing as part of the Europeana Food and Drink project, with assistance from the National Brewery Heritage Trust, Historypin, Federation of European Publishers, Fratelli Alinari, Topfoto and Keepthinking.

By Lise Schauer, Historypin

British Easter in Black & White

Happy Easter to everyone!

For this year’s Easter celebrations, we are doing a little time travel into the last century, to the United Kingdom in the 30ies and 40ies. Hand-picked black & white images by the Europeana Food and Drink partner TopFoto, also featured via our Picture Library  show British traditions and spring scenes, also depicting limited supplies and shortages for post-war Easter celebrations.

Hot Cross Buns & Fish for Good Friday

Traditionally, Hot Cross Buns are eaten for breakfast on Good Friday, being the only luxury afforded during this time of mourning. According to a legend, in A.D. 1361 a priest at St. Alban’s Abbey in Herfortshire gave these to the poor on Good Friday, and the tradition was born.

Hot Cross Buns Contest in London, March 1932 and The making of hot cross buns, March 1923
Hot Cross Buns Contest in London, March 1932 and The making of hot cross buns, March 1923

22 March 1932: Finding Britain’s champion hot cross bun eater. A contest is taking place at the East Ham skating rink in London to find the champion eater of hot cross buns. Competitors must eat as many buns as they can but must not take more than two minutes per bun. Anyone exceeding this time is disqualified.

Billingsgate Fish Market, April 1936 and
Billingsgate Fish Market, April 1936 and Preparation of Hot Cross Buns, April 1947

4 April 1936: Billingsgate Fish Market is already working at top pressure to deal with the terrific demand for Good Friday fish . The approach of the Easter festival means greatly increased work for Billinsgate , which has to supply eight million Londoners . The photo shows the busy scene at Billingsgate Market .

3 April 1947: Girl workers at the Cadby Hall bakeries of J Lyons and co, prepare for dispatched part of the huge number of hot cross buns baked the Good Friday. In this year of bread rationing there are hot cross buns for the first time.

Easter Eggs and Special Treats
Chocolate Easter Eggs, March 1947 and
Chocolate Easter Eggs, March 1947 and The Coles Quads of Pimlico, London

March 1947: Chocolate Easter eggs are in great demand this year, but the supply is very limited. Very few manufacturers are making this year owing to the rationing difficulties and shortage of man power. A girl at shuttle worth’s factory handles some austerity two ounce eggs, being prepared for nest week’s rush. In one hand she holds a pre-war chocolate egg for comparison just to torment the hungry buyers. March 1947

The Coles Quads of Pimlico, London, Left to Right Patricia Frances, Edna and Marie are all ready for Easter with their new Easter bonnets and Easter Eggs.

Easter novelties at Pascalls , Mitcham - 19 February 1924 and Dawn the famous Selfridge model and an outsize Easter egg. 17 March 1936
Easter novelties at Pascalls , Mitcham – 19 February 1924 and Dawn, the famous Selfridge model in outsize Easter egg – 17 March 1936

 

Food in Ireland

Further information on food and farming in Ireland is available on the public libraries’ website www.askaboutIreland.ie

In the past:

Early Irish farmers grew crops such as wheat, barley and oats. The main parts of the early Irish diet were milk and cereals. Butter, buttermilk and cheeses also were very popular. People also ate fish and meat. When the Celts and the Normans arrived in Ireland, they brought different ways of farming with them. Gradually, farming changed a little over the centuries. For example, until the Normans arrived in Ireland around 1169, cows were too expensive to be killed for meat. People preferred to eat the meat from pigs.

Bread&pie

Generally however, the food eaten by the early Irish people changed very little from the time until the arrival of the potato from America in the 1600s. Potatoes were easy to grow in both good and poor soil. This meant that more and more people started growing potatoes. Soon many families across Ireland were dependant on the potato.

After some time there was very little food other than potatoes available to the ordinary people of Ireland. This was because poorer people did not grow other types of food. By the 1800s many people in Ireland needed the potato to live. In 1845 a disease called Potato Blight ruined potato crops all over Ireland. Many people died from hunger because they had no other food to eat. This is known as the Great Irish Famine. It lasted for almost 5 years.

After the Famine, farmers tried to not depend on the potato alone for their food. Those who continued mostly grew crops and reared animals. Many farmers kept cows for milking and larger scale dairy farming gradually became more widespread.

Cheese&tractor

In more modern times:

Traditional Irish foods began to be seen as old-fashioned when new processed foods became available in the 1960s. Nowadays, many people are interested in the way their grandparents lived and the foods they ate. For example, in the early 1900s, bread was baked at home and the vegetables were often grown in people’s own gardens. Bacon and cabbage was a meal that was very popular in Ireland.

Nowadays, traditional Irish food can be found side by side with Italian, Chinese and other ethnic food on supermarket shelves and on restaurant menus. Traditional Irish food often takes a little longer to produce and prepare than convenient ready-made food but it is usually very healthy. Traditional methods of cooking use less salt and less fat and contain less additives.

Traditional foods used in modern recipes include farmhouse cheeses, stone ground cereals such as porridge and oatcakes, soda bread and cockles and mussels. Champ, colcannon, drisheen, boxty and Dublin coddle are still made in parts of Ireland.

platedfood

Food for Thought: From Earl Grey to Beef Wellington

People are often remembered for their deeds, some are frozen in time by statues, remembered in a street name, or by the famous blue plaque that adorns many houses in Great Britain. There are a select few however that are immortalised in food and EUFD, the Europeana Food and Drink Picture Library, has matched up some famous foods from the picture library. This is the second part of our gallery of famous foods, from Napoleon’s Brandy to Crêpe Suzette and now to the British specialties.

The Right Honourable Charles Grey , 2nd Earl Grey ( 13 March 1764 – 17 July 1845 )

The Right Honourable Charles Grey was Prime Minister of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland from 22 November 1830 to 16 July 1834 . A member of the Whig Party , he backed significant reform of the British government and was among the primary architects of the Reform Act 1832 .

The 2nd Earl Grey famously gave his name to an aromatic blend of tea after he reputedly received a gift of tea flavoured with bergamot oil.

EUFD002485 – TopFoto / EUFD & EUFD0105250 – ThePictureKitchen / EUFD
EUFD002485 – TopFoto / EUFD & EUFD0105250 – ThePictureKitchen / EUFD

The 4th Earl of Sandwich 1718-1792

The sandwich is said to be named after 4th Earl of Sandwich after he frequently called for the easily handled food while entertaining friends.

EUFD002483 – TopFoto / EUFD & EUFD101529 – ThePictureKitchen / EUFD
EUFD002483 – TopFoto / EUFD & EUFD101529 – ThePictureKitchen / EUFD

Queen Victoria (1819 – 1901)

Many foods are named after Queen Victoria who reigned for 63 years. There are for example Victoria plums or as shown, a piece of Victoria sponge cake dusted with icing sugar and filled with strawberries and cream.

The pictures display Queen Victoria in in coronation dress 20 June 1837 and in 1887.

EUFD002475 – TopFoto / EUFD & EUFD105056 – ThePictureKitchen / EUFD
EUFD002475 – TopFoto / EUFD & EUFD105056 – ThePictureKitchen / EUFD
EUFD002471 – TopFoto / EUFD & EUFD101569 – ThePictureKitchen / EUFD
EUFD002471 – TopFoto / EUFD & EUFD101569 – ThePictureKitchen / EUFD

Portrait of the Duke of Wellington by Goya &  Beef Wellington

It is believed Beef Wellington was named after the Duke of Wellington, British hero of the Battle of Waterloo.

EUFD002476 & EUFD002477 – TopFoto / EUFD
EUFD002476 & EUFD002477 – TopFoto / EUFD

Arnold Bennett, English novelist (in 1931)

Omelette Arnold Bennett (bottom) which is an unfolded omelette with smoked haddock was invented at the Savoy Hotel and named after the English novelist who wrote a novel called Imperial Palace in 1930, based on his research at the hotel.

EUFD002488 & EUFD002487 – TopFoto / EUFD
EUFD002488 & EUFD002487 – TopFoto / EUFD

In the spirit of maintaining good relations through food, the Europeana Food and Drink project has combined a rich display of food and drink cultural heritage imagery, now available to license for publication. Much of the collection is on offer for the first time to publishers and illustrates the depth of local cuisine giving a new insight to the traditional EU dish as it has migrated and adapted across the world. From simple ingredients, cooking utensils, and baking techniques to complex dishes and the many characters that are involved in the food industry, the EU Food & Drink Picture Library (EUFD) illustrates food and drink history in photographs, artwork and objects.

The EU Food & Drink Picture Library is managed by the Europeana Food and Drink project partner TopFoto.co.uk. For further information, have a look at http://eufoodanddrink.eu/.

By John John Balean, TopFoto

 

Wine in Greece Engagement Event

On Friday 26th of February,  our Greek Europeana Food and Drink Partner PostScriptum organized an engagement event in the magnificent Domaine Oenotria Land Costa Lazaridis.

The event aimed at bringing together representatives from the world of culture, wine, tourism, media and creative industries in order to exchange, learn and use content related to food and drink and to create dialogue on prospects and potential partnerships that may arise on the occasion of the Europeana Food and Drink (EFD) project. collage_WineGreece

Cultural Heritage of Wine and the Attica Wine Trail

Mr. Kostas Konstantinidis, Managing Director of PostScriptum, welcomed the guests and set the context of the discussion. Mr. Markos Bolaris, Deputy Minister of Agriculture, delivered salutation and underlined the importance of initiatives such as the EFD project regarding the development of the economy and of synergies’ climate. Mrs Maria Triantafyllou, Director of the National Interprofessional Organisation of Vine and Wine (EDOAO) spoke for the benefits of such attempts of the wine industry.

Mr. Nikolaos Simos from NTUA presented Europeana and the NTUA participation in EFD project and PostScriptum and Mrs Alexandra Nikiforidou, presented the scope, the achievements and the impact of the project.

PostScriptum and Mrs. Vasia Pierrou introduced visitors of the evening to  the Attica Wine Trail which was created with material uploaded to Europeana in the context of EFD project. The applicaton was implemented with the contribution of wineries of Attica and the support of EDOAO.

collage_wineGreece2

Europeana, Clio Muse and Big Olive

The presentation closed with the speeches of Mr. John Nikolopoulos from Clio Muse, winner at 1st Open Innovation Challenge of EFD, and Mr. John Zaras from Big Olive, who were referred to successful examples of cultural content exploitation. Mr. Nikolopoulos talked about the experience of Clio Muse in the contest and the business exhibits interface designed from various museums in Europe through the Europeana network with stories about food and drink, for which the app was awarded. Mr. John Zaras talked about the food and drink trails that Big Olive implements in the physical space and their connection with the cultural content and the EFD project.

The presentations were followed by a tour in the Wine Museum and of course food accompanied by fine wine, sponsorship of Domaine Lazaridis. Participants had the opportunity to learn further about the project, to know each other better and to discuss ideas for possible future collaborations and synergies.

 

By Vasia Pierrou, PostScriptum

Taart? Taart! Heritage Day in Leuven

From 22nd of April to 31st of May, the Europeana Food and Drink Touring Exhibition on cake takes a stop at the retirement home in Leuven.

The  Heritage Day on Sunday, 24th of April 2016 for families celebrates cake in every aspect: With workshops, a theatre, photobooth and crafts corner where children can create their favourite cake out of paper, and a movie on three elderly bakers that are now living in the retirement home.

Take a look at the flyer (in Dutch) here:

collage_flyerHeritageDay

Food For Thought: From Napoleon’s Brandy to Crêpe Suzette

People are often remembered for their deeds, some are frozen in time by statues, remembered in a street name, or by the famous blue plaque that adorns many houses in Great Britain. There are a select few however that are immortalised in food and EUFD, the Europeana Food and Drink Picture Library, has matched up some famous foods from the picture library.

Napoleon – ‘Napoleon Bonaparte’ by Laurent Dabos. (1761-1835)

Advertisement for Courvoisier cognac – the brandy of Napoleon. French distilleries named their best cognac Napoleon as a symbol of prestige and quality. Still used today Napoleon Brandy is known as XO, extra old, and designates a blend in which the youngest brandy is stored for at least six years.

EUFD002474 & EUFD002474 – TopFoto / EUFD
EUFD002474 & EUFD002474 – TopFoto / EUFD

ANNA PAVLOVA as The Dying Swan from SWAN LAKE in 1931 & Strawberry Pavlova

The meringue-based dessert, Pavlova, is named after the Russian ballerina Anna Pavlova. The dessert is believed to have been created in honour of the dancer either during or after one of her tours to Australia and New Zealand in the 1920s.

EUFD002473 – TopFoto / EUFD
EUFD002473  &  EUFD002479– TopFoto / EUFD

Dame Nellie Melba, GBE (19 May 1860 or 61 – 23 February 1931)

Born Helen Porter Mitchell, Dame Nelli Melba was a legendary Australian opera soprano and probably the most famous of all sopranos. She was the first Australian to achieve international recognition in the form of one of the first entertainers to become a DBE in 1918.

Peach Melba was created by Auguste Escoffier at the Savoy Hotel in London for Dame Nellie Melba who was living there for a time.

EUFD002468 & EUFD002478 – TopFoto / EUFD
EUFD002468 & EUFD002478 – TopFoto / EUFD

Canapes of melba toast topped with crab and crossed chives – Melba Toast -was created by Auguste Escoffier at the Savoy Hotel in London when Dame Nellie Melba had a bout of illness while she was living there. In the picture, the Opera singer is shown as Lakme, one of the many French roles in which she excelled.

EUFD002480 – TopFoto / EUFD & EUFD105172 – ThePictureKitchen / EUFD
EUFD002480 – TopFoto / EUFD & EUFD105172 – ThePictureKitchen / EUFD

M. Auguste Escoffier – creator of many signature dishes and the father of french cooking

For years M. Escoffier carried the fame of French cooking all over the world including England, the United States, Canada, Spain, Russia and Brazil – he personally served Napoleon III and once the ex-Kaiser was at a banquet which Escoffier had prepared. King Edward brought him to London and for many years he worked at the Savoy, the Ritz and the Carlton – photo shows the last picture of Auguste Escoffier at his villa at Monte Carlo, 12 February 1935.

On the right, you can see a portrait of Sarah Bernhardt by Manuel Orazi (1898-1934). The celebrity chef, at this time at the Savoy Hotel, created the dessert, fraises à la Sarah Bernhardt, in her honour which consists of strawberries with pineapple and Curaçao sorbet.

EUFD002470 – TopFoto / EUFD & EUFD101019 – ThePictureKitchen / EUFD
EUFD002470  & EUFD101019 – TopFoto / EUFD

Rita Hayworth, glamorous Columbia star and actress. 5 January 1947 & Margarita

Enrique Bastate Gutierrez claimed he invented the drink Margarita in Tijuana in the 1940s for Rita Hayworth. Hayworth’s real name was Margarita Cansino.

Margarita: 1 third Grand Marnier – 1 third tequila – 1 third freshly squeezed lime juice
Wet the rim of a cocktail glass with lime juice and dip into salt. Fill a tall shaker with ice. Add the lime juice, the Grand Marnier liqueur and the tequila. Add sugar to taste. Shake and pour into the glass. Garnish with a lime wedge.

EUFD002484 – TopFoto / EUFD & EUFD105118 – ThePictureKitchen / EUFD
EUFD002484 – TopFoto / EUFD & EUFD105118 – ThePictureKitchen / EUFD

Suzanne Reichenberg (1853-1924), French actress & Crêpe Suzette

Suzanne Reichenberg made her debut in 1868 in the role of Agnes at l’Ecole des femmes at the Comedie-Francaise. She was queen of the theatre ingenues from 1870 to 1900. The dessert Crêpe Suzette, Orange Liqueur Crepes, was named in honour of the French actress.

EUFD002484 – TopFoto / EUFD & EUFD105118 – ThePictureKitchen / EUFD
EUFD002484 – TopFoto / EUFD & EUFD105118 – ThePictureKitchen / EUFD

In the spirit of maintaining good relations through food, the Europeana Food and Drink project has combined a rich display of food and drink cultural heritage imagery, now available to license for publication. Much of the collection is on offer for the first time to publishers and illustrates the depth of local cuisine giving a new insight to the traditional EU dish as it has migrated and adapted across the world. From simple ingredients, cooking utensils, and baking techniques to complex dishes and the many characters that are involved in the food industry, the EU Food & Drink Picture Library (EUFD) illustrates food and drink history in photographs, artwork and objects.

The EU Food & Drink Picture Library is managed by the Europeana Food and Drink project partner TopFoto.co.uk. For further information, have a look at http://eufoodanddrink.eu/.

By John John Balean, TopFoto