Category Archives: Culture change

Final All Partners Meeting in Budapest

Europeana Food and Drink Plenary Meeting
Budapest, 6th-7th June, 2016
#EFDfinal

For the fourth and final Plenary Meeting, all partners of Europeana Food and Drink gathered in the heart of Europe, in Budapest.  The Hungarian Museum of Trade and Tourism (MKVM), culture sector partner within the project and also the only dedicated museum of travel and tourism in the world, welcomed participants with warm Hungarian hospitality and of course, culinary heritage and culture.

In the morning of 6th of June, representatives of the Project Management Board assembled to discuss final steps within the project and set the main focus for the two days: As the project officially terminates end of June 2016, a recap, lessons learned and ideas to maximise the legacy of the project, but also organisational matters were part of the agenda.

Europeana Food and Drink All Partners Meeting in Budapest - Image Courtesy of Europeana Food and Drink
Europeana Food and Drink All Partners Meeting in Budapest

More than 45 representatives of all partner institutions discussed key achievements, experiences but also any open tasks for the finalization and reporting of the project. It was  emphasized how personal relationships and advocacy as well as the community are important factors for bringing forward a project such as Europeana Food and Drink.

As a special guest, we were happy to welcome external collaborators from Greece: Maria Triantafyllou, Director of the National Interprofessional Organisation of Vine and Wine (EDOAO)  and Filippos Mazarakis-Ainian from the National Historical Museum of Greece shared their experiences working together with  Europeana Food and Drink.

collage_All Partners Meeting Budapest

Surrounding these two days of meeting, partners learned about the Hungarian food culture, both in theory and practice: The food and drink related exhibitions of MKVM and a great local dinner, topped by an evening boat trip on the Danube set the tone for a fruitful and positive meeting.

Thanks a lot to The Hungarian Museum of Trade and Tourism and Collections Trust, coordinator of the project, for hosting and organizing the final All Partners Meeting in Budapest.

By Angelika Leitner, Austrian National Library

Merken

Merken

If Europeana Sounds be the food of love…

Now that Europeana Sounds, Europeana Food and Drink’s sister project dedicated to sounds,  has aggregated over 300,000 sounds and nearly 200,000 audio-related objects, many different topics are covered – not just music but politics, culture, languages and wildlife. If you have a search for different types of food on Europeana Sounds, you certainly won’t be disappointed by the diverse material which comes up. Europeana Food and Drink is proud to share this guest post by our partner Europeana Sounds with you – because food can certainly be enjoyed in many different ways!

If Europeana Sounds be the food of love…

By Tom Miles, The British Library, Europeana Sounds. With images via Europeana Food and Drink

To celebrate the Easter period, we posted a blog about eggs in general and, in particular, Easter eggs. This blog post will be casting the net a little wider and will take a look at other foodstuffs. Let’s start by looking forward to “The old Sunday dinner”, a song from the Irish Traditional Music Archive.

At the Dinner Table by James Elliot. Hand-coloured stereograph, 1860s. Victoria and Albert Museum
At the Dinner Table by James Elliot. Hand-coloured stereograph, 1860s. Victoria and Albert Museum

And here’s an interview concerning coffee and croissants in Naples. You can find out more about making white puddings and haggis here. And the Howard University Choir treat us to a rendition of “Let us break bread together”.

For a taste of the more upmarket, the chef Michel Bourdin talks about turbot, quail eggs, crab bisque and more when he worked at the Connaught Hotel. And the Dungeness fisherman Mark Richardson talks about terms used for fish and shellfish across the fishing industry in the United Kingdom. Some names are the same throughout, but some change from region to region.

"Maria mit dem Jesukinde, den Missionaren das Brot reichend", Austrian National Library. "The Fish Seller", Nottingham City Museums and Galleries
“Maria mit dem Jesukinde, den Missionaren das Brot reichend”, Austrian National Library.The Fish Seller”, Nottingham City Museums and Galleries

Lasagne, pasta, ravioli and brioche all get a mention, in this interview with a villager from Tende.

 Fàbrica de Pastas la Ideal, fotos de la publicitat pel programa de Festa Major, Generalitat de Catalunya. Arxiu Comarcal de l'Anoia
Fàbrica de Pastas la Ideal, fotos de la publicitat pel programa de Festa Major,
Generalitat de Catalunya. Arxiu Comarcal de l’Anoia

But, why take our word for it? Find out more for yourself! Just to get you started, we have nearly 200 references to breakfast… 60 references to supper… 440 references to dinner…  265 references to coffee…  and, finally, 677 references to tea… including everyone’s favourite food-based melody, “Tea for Two” – from Bing Crosby, Lester Young, Fats Waller and others.

If you find any more interesting food-related sounds, please do let us know!

All these recordings are shared through Europeana Sounds, ground-breaking project supported by the European Commission.  Launched beginning of 2014, Europeana Sounds aims at offering a much needed gateway to Europe’s sound and music heritage, ranging from music and radio programmes to spoken word, environment, and sound effects recordings.

Merken

Merken

Merken

Merken

Merken

Tell us what you see: annotating the Royal Museum for Central Africa’s collections on Historypin

The Royal Museum for Central Africa (RMCA) visited Historypin in London beginning of May to learn more about crowdsourcing and to discuss ways of engaging people with their priceless collection of food and drink related photographs taken in colonial Africa. This workshop was organised as part of the community engagement work in the Europeana Food and Drink project.


The RMCA is a respected cultural institution from Belgium, collecting material relating to Central Africa and providing a platform for current debate about Africa. Historypin is a website where communities and organisations can contribute their local and regional history.

Dieter and Joke at the Historypin headquarters, London. The market in Lusambo, from the Royal Museum of Central Africa’s collection
Dieter and Joke at the Historypin headquarters, London. The market in Lusambo, from the Royal Museum of Central Africa’s collection
Tell us what you see

Dieter and Joke from the RMCA met up with Lise from Historypin to talk about how they could showcase their great photographic collection to their audiences, as well as how they could use Historypin’s crowdsourcing tools to generate engagement and annotations.

As a result of the workshop, the RMCA will upload around 350 of their photographs from the Europeana Food and Drink content base to Historypin.org and ask their audiences to comment on the photo and describe the people, scenes and activities in it. These comments can then be pulled back to Europeana, as well as to RMCA’s own content management system, through Historypin’s API.  

An example of the comment section on Historypin.org, where users can contribute their descriptions of the photographs
Users can contribute their descriptions of the photos on Historypin.org

As Dieter said: “I would recommend uploading your collections to Historypin to everyone. It is a very easy way to get your collections out there where they can be seen. Being able to get your content enriched by your audiences on a nice looking platform is great, especially if you can then pull back these enrichments to your own database.”


The RMCA and Historypin will launch their crowdsourcing campaign in June 2016.

By Lise Schauer, Historypin

 

“A public house is a public home, so be a part of it.” An interview with ebook author Adrian Tierney-Jones

As the final instalment of our blog series about the London Local Pubs: Past and Present ebook, we interview Adrian Tierney-Jones, well-known British pub and beer writer and the author of the book and ebook. We picked his brain about pubs and why he likes writing about them, and asked him about his research for this particular book, which ended up differing a little from his usual process.

What did you like best about working on this book?

I loved finding out about pubs that I’ve never heard of. It gave me a sudden interest to seek them out. For example, I’d be keen to visit the Railway Tavern in the East End, the one with the early morning opening hours for the railway workers.

As I’ve written many books about pubs in London, I think I know them all. I also used to live in London and know many pubs personally. However, this book has opened up a whole new layer of them for me to engage with. It is always great to discover and rediscover pubs.

Railway Tavern, Stratford
Railway Tavern, Stratford 

What did you think about the story-gathering process and did it help with your research?

The story-gathering process was really great. Historypin’s Community Officers would go and set up a community archiving session in one of the pubs, where they invited landlords, regulars and locals to come and share their memories and experiences of the pub. In some pubs, they even collected photographs and drawings. They would then send me the audio files and their transcriptions, as well as the materials they had collected.

For me, this was very helpful. It takes a lot of time to do research and sometimes professional writers just don’t have the luxury to do this in-depth work. Having a team that goes out and talks to the people in the pubs is very useful.

Pub Session
Pub Session

What advice would you give people who also want to write books about pubs?

Listen to people. Pubs aren’t just the buildings they occupy or the beer they serve, but they are made up of people, past and present. When you write about a pub, you need to evoke the atmosphere of the pub and make the reader feel that they are part of this mini-universe by engaging all their senses. But not just the reader needs to feel a connection to the pub, you do too. A public house is a public home, so be a part of it.

 

London Local Pubs: Past and Present is an ebook developed as part of the Europeana Food and Drink project, taking the reader on a journey through the history of London’s pubs, told through never-before-seen archival photographs and the stories and memories from their landlords and regulars. You can find more information about it and buy a copy of it at www.londonlocalpubs.com

By Lise Schauer, Historypin

Cake, Heritage and Mother’s Day

This April 24th saw the yearly Heritage Day in Flanders, Belgium with the 2016 overall theme ‘Rituals’. Pretty ideal to connect this with the Cake exhibition! Cake goes along with a lot of rituals: think of blowing birthday candles, newlyweds cutting wedding cake together, and many others.

The Europeana Food and Drink touring exhibition Cake? Cake! , organized by the project partners Centre for Agrarian History and Royal Museums of Art and History is residing in Leuven, Belgium in Woonzorgcentrum Edouard Remy, a home for elderly people since April 22th.

The director of the Woonzorgcentrum was more than willing to co-operate and host a Heritage Day for his residents and all visitors.

“We wanted to work intergenerational, so we aimed at getting as many families with children to the home. A children’s play about cake  was organized and we developed an educational package to go with the cake exhibition. And we hired a photobooth. Big and small could dress up and pretend to eat a piece of cake. Everybody loved it. Wheelchairs aside, and getting up for five minutes to have that picture taken with son or daughter, grandchild or even greatgrandchild. And in the background: the campaign image of the Cake exhibition, the little baker”, Greet Draye from Centre for Agrarian History describes the atmosphere of the day.

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Heritage Day Leuven, 24th April 2016

Afterwards there was time for a real piece of cake. Speaking of which:  Mother’s Day is approaching. No better occasion to treat your mum with cake than that!

Cake for Mother’s Day

In Belgium the tradition of eating cake at Mother’s Day occurred for the first time in the fifties. And since mum was the one who used to bake cakes those days, a mother’s day cake was always to be bought at the baker’s. Mother’s day was – and still is – the high day for mothers and bakers.

Mother's Day Cakes, Bakkerijmuseum Veurne
Mother’s Day Cakes from Bakkerij Baelde, around 1950-1960, Bakkerijmuseum Veurne

By Greet Draye, Centre for Agrarian History and Angelika Leitner, Austrian National Library

London Local Pubs: Exploring the National Brewery Heritage Trust collection

At the heart of the book and ebook  London Local Pubs: Past and Present by Adrian Tierney-Jones is the National Brewery Heritage Trust (NBHT) image collection of public houses. 3000 images were rescued from a skip as the company moved offices and have recently been digitised by Heritage Assets for creative re-use in the Europeana Food and Drink project.

Trafalgar,39 St. Martins Lane, London, W6, Hoare & Co. and Farriers, 214 Lower Road, Deptford, SE8 5DJ, Charringtons
Trafalgar,39 St. Martins Lane, London, W6, Hoare & Co. and Farriers, 214 Lower Road, Deptford, SE8 5DJ, Charringtons

Now made available for the first time on Europeana, the NBHT image collection is available to license via the Europeana Food & Drink picture library.

The majority of the collection was originally used as a pictorial reference of the buildings owned by Hoare and Co. and the Charrington Brewery and on the back carried the exact address of the pub and often recorded the names of the landlords and their business activity. From the early 20th century up to the late 1960’s the images are a unique pictorial record which are of interest to professional image researchers, academics, and the many individuals who have ties to the pillar of the community that is better known as our ‘local pub’.

Hare & Hounds, North End Way, Hampstead Heath, NW3 7HE, 1940, 1941, Hoare & Co
Hare & Hounds, North End Way, Hampstead Heath, NW3 7HE, 1940, 1941, Hoare & Co
Locomotive, 106 West Street, Deal, CT14 6EB, 1952, Charringtons and Red Lion, 18 Watling Street, Cannon Street, EC4, Charringtons
Locomotive, 106 West Street, Deal, CT14 6EB, 1952, Charringtons and Red Lion, 18 Watling Street, Cannon Street, EC4, Charringtons

By John Balean, Topfoto

This is part 4 of our blogpost series on the London Local Pubs: Past and Present ebook, exploring the pub photo collection the book is based on. Read more on the idea behind the ebook edition, a view of ‘traditional’ publishing on reuse of digital cultural heritage, and 7 tips for self-publishing & promotion, or join a Pub Crawl for all your senses with our sister project Europeana Sounds.

The London Local Pubs: Past and Present ebook is available for purchase  here.

 

The London Local Pubs: Past and Present ebook has been published by Halsgrove Publishing as part of the Europeana Food and Drink project, with assistance from the National Brewery Heritage Trust, Historypin, Federation of European Publishers, Fratelli Alinari, Topfoto and Keepthinking.

How to get the best out of your ebook: 7 Tips for Self-publishing & Promotion

After learning and gaining experiences through the creation of the two Europeana Food and Drink book products, London Local Pubs: Past and Present and the eCookbook Tasting Historical Europe – Exploring the culinary threads between Austria and Lithuania, we asked our cluster partners to share these lessons with us. This blogpost is part three of our series on the development of the London Local Pubs: Past and Present ebook.

Promoting books and ebooks can be tricky, as many different solutions are available in  the market today. Because of information flood, it is important to be sure that your message is delivered to the proper key person, professionally and in a convincing way.

Photographs by Cath Harries.
London Local Pubs Launch Event at Magpie & Stump (Photographs by Cath Harries)

Here is a summary selection of some hints to consider when a self publisher wants to promote his/her own book and ebook. These hints are derived from the research done by Andrea de Polo from Fratelli Alinari as part of the publication of the London Local Pubs book and ebook.

1. If possible, provide a Kindle version of the book. Amazon is one of the main platforms for the sale of ebooks and they predominantly sell Kindle-compatible ebooks.

2. Use professional DTP (desktop publishing) software and if needed, find a dedicated and proficient writer for the book and ebook.

3. Make sure you design the website similar to the book, with an option and/or link to purchase and download.

4. Organize a local kickoff event to launch the publication: be sure to invite local key people, contributors, journalists or blogger. For London Local Pubs: Past and Present, the launch was celebrated at The Magpie & Stump in central London, one of the pubs featured in the book, bringing together over 100 people from across the pub, beer and brewing world, including many of the licensees and regulars who contributed their stories and memories to the book.

5. In launch period, create an online buzz on your main social media platforms. Try to engage your audience in different ways, such as inviting people to participate in an online“Tweet-up” event with a dedicated hashtag (See #52Pubs) or have giveaways such as a sample chapter.

6. Use your social networks the right way: Avoid spam and mass mails, instead create targeted and personalized emails to influencers in your field. Write blogs and news for writers and authors with meaningful objectives related to the topic and worthwhile for your target audience to subscribe to. This can be teaser posts using information from the book, which might want the reader to get the full book

7. Use radio and traditional media too to communicate about the launch of the product. Be sure to do so before the product enters the market, so you can generate anticipation for it.

What are your number one methods for promoting your ebook?  We learned that most important, these promotion tactics need to be tailored to your product and to what works best for the topic and target audience of your ebook.

 

Check out London Local Pubs: Past and Present, available for purchase here or download our free eCookbook on the historic connection of Austrian and Lithuanian cuisine.

 

By Andrea de Polo, Fratelli Alinari and Angelika Leitner, Austrian National Library

The books have been made possible by the Europeana Food and Drink project, funded by the European Union. The London Local Pubs: Past and Present ebook has been published by Halsgrove Publishing with assistance from the National Brewery Heritage Trust, Historypin, Federation of European Publishers, Fratelli Alinari, Topfoto and Keepthinking. The eCookbook Tasting Historical Europe – Exploring the culinary threads between Austria and Lithuania  was developed by project partners Vilnius University – Faculty of Communication and Austrian National Library.

 

Reuse of digital cultural heritage through the eyes of ‘traditional’ publishing

As part two of our blogpost series on the London Local Pubs: Past and Present ebook, Enrico Turrin of FEP is giving us some insight into ebooks and the reuse of digital cultural heritage through the eyes of ‘traditional’ publishing.

Publishing & Europe’s food and drink heritage

As the Federation of European Publishers (FEP), we got involved in the Europeana Food and Drink project as representatives of the book publishing sector, in order to contribute with our knowledge and experience about book publishing and to act as a contact with publishers from all over Europe. After all, one of the expected outcomes of the project was the publication of a book and an ebook!

At the same time, we thought the project would yield results that were interesting for publishers: a large library of high quality digital objects from many museums, archives and other cultural institutions across Europe, related to a trendy and fascinating topic like our food and drink culture, and available for commercial reuse.

The publication of the book London Local Pubs: Past and Present was the first, very tangible result of the collaboration of several project partners, and a good one, at that. Available in both print and digital, the book embodies the spirit of Europeana Food and Drink: it focuses on a traditional aspect of the food and (especially) drink culture, with an eye to history and one to modern times, using a wealth of beautiful images from past and present.

eBookpostFEP
Morris Dancers passing the Magpie & Stump; The Queen’s Head between 1930 and 1960
Book or eBook?

We think that these kinds of publications, on similar topics and with such interesting source materials, are very well suited for different formats, print and digital. On one hand, beautiful pictures make for nice illustrated books that figure well on your bookshelf or coffee table. On the other hand, the topic of food and drink is great for cookbooks and travel guides and many other publications that can be greatly enhanced by the features of digital books: easy to carry, enhanced, interactive, etc.

We are therefore promoting Europeana Food and Drink among our constituency, the book publishing sector, hoping to see this experience replicated many times. Besides regularly updating our members (28 national associations of book publishers from all over Europe), we have organised presentations about the project and its content base at the Frankfurt Book Fair with a dedicated area for the food and drink topic, called Gourmet Gallery and the London Book Fair just this week.

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Enrico Turrin, FEP at London Book Fair, 12th April 2016

To make sure that the content made available through Europeana Food and Drink can express its full potential in terms of commercial reuse, we recommend that it is made easily searchable, and made available at very clear conditions.

By Enrico Turrin, Federation of European Publishers

 

The London Local Pubs: Past and Present ebook has been published by Halsgrove Publishing as part of the Europeana Food and Drink project, with assistance from the National Brewery Heritage Trust, Historypin, Federation of European Publishers, Fratelli Alinari, Topfoto and Keepthinking.

London Local Pubs: Past and Present — the ebook edition

Today we shine the spotlight on the London Local Pubs: Past and Present ebook, one of the Europeana Food and Drink products. The portable format of this publication makes it the perfect companion for visiting London to enjoy the traditional British pubs, or for discovering them from the comfort of your own home. It is available for purchase here.

The ebook tells the stories of 52 pubs in and around London through stunning historical photographs and memories shared by pub landlords and regulars. It includes a map and address details for each pub, so it is easy to visit and experience them for yourself.

London Local Pubs - Past and Present eBook edition

 

In the ebook, each historical image contains a link to Europeana.eu, where you can find more information about the photograph. There is also a link to Historypin.org for every pub, so you can contribute your own pictures and memories to the growing archive of stories there.

London Local Pubs: Past and Present is written by Adrian Tierney-Jones, a pub and beer writer from the United Kingdom. He has drawn together all stories and anecdotes about each pub into rich, evocative descriptions, such as the one about the Newman Arms below.

“Here we are in Fitzrovia with Dylan Thomas cadging a drink and offering some words on a scrap of paper as payment. Or maybe it’s George Orwell, silent in the corner, mulling over his pint, observing and seeing all (he used the Newman Arms as a model for the proles’ pub in 1984; it also appeared in Keep The Aspidistra Flying). Other picaresque characters, whose novels, poems and paintings failed to move further than the table, have also come and gone through the doors of the Newman Arms since the 1940s, when this close-knit grid of streets first developed its racy, bohemian reputation.”

 

London Local Pubs - Past and Present eBook edition

If you want to explore the pubs in a different way, why not visit museums.eu/trails and follow one of the pub trails there? All 3414 photographs from the Charrington collection, which form the basis of the ebook, are also available to browse on Europeana.eu here.

This blogpost is the first in a series in the development of the London Local Pubs: Past and Present ebook. The next installment, written by Enrico Turrin of FEP, gives some insight into ebooks and the reuse of digital cultural heritage through the eyes of ‘traditional’ publishing.

 

The London Local Pubs: Past and Present ebook has been published by Halsgrove Publishing as part of the Europeana Food and Drink project, with assistance from the National Brewery Heritage Trust, Historypin, Federation of European Publishers, Fratelli Alinari, Topfoto and Keepthinking.

By Lise Schauer, Historypin

British Easter in Black & White

Happy Easter to everyone!

For this year’s Easter celebrations, we are doing a little time travel into the last century, to the United Kingdom in the 30ies and 40ies. Hand-picked black & white images by the Europeana Food and Drink partner TopFoto, also featured via our Picture Library  show British traditions and spring scenes, also depicting limited supplies and shortages for post-war Easter celebrations.

Hot Cross Buns & Fish for Good Friday

Traditionally, Hot Cross Buns are eaten for breakfast on Good Friday, being the only luxury afforded during this time of mourning. According to a legend, in A.D. 1361 a priest at St. Alban’s Abbey in Herfortshire gave these to the poor on Good Friday, and the tradition was born.

Hot Cross Buns Contest in London, March 1932 and The making of hot cross buns, March 1923
Hot Cross Buns Contest in London, March 1932 and The making of hot cross buns, March 1923

22 March 1932: Finding Britain’s champion hot cross bun eater. A contest is taking place at the East Ham skating rink in London to find the champion eater of hot cross buns. Competitors must eat as many buns as they can but must not take more than two minutes per bun. Anyone exceeding this time is disqualified.

Billingsgate Fish Market, April 1936 and
Billingsgate Fish Market, April 1936 and Preparation of Hot Cross Buns, April 1947

4 April 1936: Billingsgate Fish Market is already working at top pressure to deal with the terrific demand for Good Friday fish . The approach of the Easter festival means greatly increased work for Billinsgate , which has to supply eight million Londoners . The photo shows the busy scene at Billingsgate Market .

3 April 1947: Girl workers at the Cadby Hall bakeries of J Lyons and co, prepare for dispatched part of the huge number of hot cross buns baked the Good Friday. In this year of bread rationing there are hot cross buns for the first time.

Easter Eggs and Special Treats
Chocolate Easter Eggs, March 1947 and
Chocolate Easter Eggs, March 1947 and The Coles Quads of Pimlico, London

March 1947: Chocolate Easter eggs are in great demand this year, but the supply is very limited. Very few manufacturers are making this year owing to the rationing difficulties and shortage of man power. A girl at shuttle worth’s factory handles some austerity two ounce eggs, being prepared for nest week’s rush. In one hand she holds a pre-war chocolate egg for comparison just to torment the hungry buyers. March 1947

The Coles Quads of Pimlico, London, Left to Right Patricia Frances, Edna and Marie are all ready for Easter with their new Easter bonnets and Easter Eggs.

Easter novelties at Pascalls , Mitcham - 19 February 1924 and Dawn the famous Selfridge model and an outsize Easter egg. 17 March 1936
Easter novelties at Pascalls , Mitcham – 19 February 1924 and Dawn, the famous Selfridge model in outsize Easter egg – 17 March 1936