Category Archives: Culture change

Food for Thought: From Earl Grey to Beef Wellington

People are often remembered for their deeds, some are frozen in time by statues, remembered in a street name, or by the famous blue plaque that adorns many houses in Great Britain. There are a select few however that are immortalised in food and EUFD, the Europeana Food and Drink Picture Library, has matched up some famous foods from the picture library. This is the second part of our gallery of famous foods, from Napoleon’s Brandy to Crêpe Suzette and now to the British specialties.

The Right Honourable Charles Grey , 2nd Earl Grey ( 13 March 1764 – 17 July 1845 )

The Right Honourable Charles Grey was Prime Minister of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland from 22 November 1830 to 16 July 1834 . A member of the Whig Party , he backed significant reform of the British government and was among the primary architects of the Reform Act 1832 .

The 2nd Earl Grey famously gave his name to an aromatic blend of tea after he reputedly received a gift of tea flavoured with bergamot oil.

EUFD002485 – TopFoto / EUFD & EUFD0105250 – ThePictureKitchen / EUFD
EUFD002485 – TopFoto / EUFD & EUFD0105250 – ThePictureKitchen / EUFD

The 4th Earl of Sandwich 1718-1792

The sandwich is said to be named after 4th Earl of Sandwich after he frequently called for the easily handled food while entertaining friends.

EUFD002483 – TopFoto / EUFD & EUFD101529 – ThePictureKitchen / EUFD
EUFD002483 – TopFoto / EUFD & EUFD101529 – ThePictureKitchen / EUFD

Queen Victoria (1819 – 1901)

Many foods are named after Queen Victoria who reigned for 63 years. There are for example Victoria plums or as shown, a piece of Victoria sponge cake dusted with icing sugar and filled with strawberries and cream.

The pictures display Queen Victoria in in coronation dress 20 June 1837 and in 1887.

EUFD002475 – TopFoto / EUFD & EUFD105056 – ThePictureKitchen / EUFD
EUFD002475 – TopFoto / EUFD & EUFD105056 – ThePictureKitchen / EUFD
EUFD002471 – TopFoto / EUFD & EUFD101569 – ThePictureKitchen / EUFD
EUFD002471 – TopFoto / EUFD & EUFD101569 – ThePictureKitchen / EUFD

Portrait of the Duke of Wellington by Goya &  Beef Wellington

It is believed Beef Wellington was named after the Duke of Wellington, British hero of the Battle of Waterloo.

EUFD002476 & EUFD002477 – TopFoto / EUFD
EUFD002476 & EUFD002477 – TopFoto / EUFD

Arnold Bennett, English novelist (in 1931)

Omelette Arnold Bennett (bottom) which is an unfolded omelette with smoked haddock was invented at the Savoy Hotel and named after the English novelist who wrote a novel called Imperial Palace in 1930, based on his research at the hotel.

EUFD002488 & EUFD002487 – TopFoto / EUFD
EUFD002488 & EUFD002487 – TopFoto / EUFD

In the spirit of maintaining good relations through food, the Europeana Food and Drink project has combined a rich display of food and drink cultural heritage imagery, now available to license for publication. Much of the collection is on offer for the first time to publishers and illustrates the depth of local cuisine giving a new insight to the traditional EU dish as it has migrated and adapted across the world. From simple ingredients, cooking utensils, and baking techniques to complex dishes and the many characters that are involved in the food industry, the EU Food & Drink Picture Library (EUFD) illustrates food and drink history in photographs, artwork and objects.

The EU Food & Drink Picture Library is managed by the Europeana Food and Drink project partner TopFoto.co.uk. For further information, have a look at http://eufoodanddrink.eu/.

By John John Balean, TopFoto

 

Wine in Greece Engagement Event

On Friday 26th of February,  our Greek Europeana Food and Drink Partner PostScriptum organized an engagement event in the magnificent Domaine Oenotria Land Costa Lazaridis.

The event aimed at bringing together representatives from the world of culture, wine, tourism, media and creative industries in order to exchange, learn and use content related to food and drink and to create dialogue on prospects and potential partnerships that may arise on the occasion of the Europeana Food and Drink (EFD) project. collage_WineGreece

Cultural Heritage of Wine and the Attica Wine Trail

Mr. Kostas Konstantinidis, Managing Director of PostScriptum, welcomed the guests and set the context of the discussion. Mr. Markos Bolaris, Deputy Minister of Agriculture, delivered salutation and underlined the importance of initiatives such as the EFD project regarding the development of the economy and of synergies’ climate. Mrs Maria Triantafyllou, Director of the National Interprofessional Organisation of Vine and Wine (EDOAO) spoke for the benefits of such attempts of the wine industry.

Mr. Nikolaos Simos from NTUA presented Europeana and the NTUA participation in EFD project and PostScriptum and Mrs Alexandra Nikiforidou, presented the scope, the achievements and the impact of the project.

PostScriptum and Mrs. Vasia Pierrou introduced visitors of the evening to  the Attica Wine Trail which was created with material uploaded to Europeana in the context of EFD project. The applicaton was implemented with the contribution of wineries of Attica and the support of EDOAO.

collage_wineGreece2

Europeana, Clio Muse and Big Olive

The presentation closed with the speeches of Mr. John Nikolopoulos from Clio Muse, winner at 1st Open Innovation Challenge of EFD, and Mr. John Zaras from Big Olive, who were referred to successful examples of cultural content exploitation. Mr. Nikolopoulos talked about the experience of Clio Muse in the contest and the business exhibits interface designed from various museums in Europe through the Europeana network with stories about food and drink, for which the app was awarded. Mr. John Zaras talked about the food and drink trails that Big Olive implements in the physical space and their connection with the cultural content and the EFD project.

The presentations were followed by a tour in the Wine Museum and of course food accompanied by fine wine, sponsorship of Domaine Lazaridis. Participants had the opportunity to learn further about the project, to know each other better and to discuss ideas for possible future collaborations and synergies.

 

By Vasia Pierrou, PostScriptum

Food For Thought: From Napoleon’s Brandy to Crêpe Suzette

People are often remembered for their deeds, some are frozen in time by statues, remembered in a street name, or by the famous blue plaque that adorns many houses in Great Britain. There are a select few however that are immortalised in food and EUFD, the Europeana Food and Drink Picture Library, has matched up some famous foods from the picture library.

Napoleon – ‘Napoleon Bonaparte’ by Laurent Dabos. (1761-1835)

Advertisement for Courvoisier cognac – the brandy of Napoleon. French distilleries named their best cognac Napoleon as a symbol of prestige and quality. Still used today Napoleon Brandy is known as XO, extra old, and designates a blend in which the youngest brandy is stored for at least six years.

EUFD002474 & EUFD002474 – TopFoto / EUFD
EUFD002474 & EUFD002474 – TopFoto / EUFD

ANNA PAVLOVA as The Dying Swan from SWAN LAKE in 1931 & Strawberry Pavlova

The meringue-based dessert, Pavlova, is named after the Russian ballerina Anna Pavlova. The dessert is believed to have been created in honour of the dancer either during or after one of her tours to Australia and New Zealand in the 1920s.

EUFD002473 – TopFoto / EUFD
EUFD002473  &  EUFD002479– TopFoto / EUFD

Dame Nellie Melba, GBE (19 May 1860 or 61 – 23 February 1931)

Born Helen Porter Mitchell, Dame Nelli Melba was a legendary Australian opera soprano and probably the most famous of all sopranos. She was the first Australian to achieve international recognition in the form of one of the first entertainers to become a DBE in 1918.

Peach Melba was created by Auguste Escoffier at the Savoy Hotel in London for Dame Nellie Melba who was living there for a time.

EUFD002468 & EUFD002478 – TopFoto / EUFD
EUFD002468 & EUFD002478 – TopFoto / EUFD

Canapes of melba toast topped with crab and crossed chives – Melba Toast -was created by Auguste Escoffier at the Savoy Hotel in London when Dame Nellie Melba had a bout of illness while she was living there. In the picture, the Opera singer is shown as Lakme, one of the many French roles in which she excelled.

EUFD002480 – TopFoto / EUFD & EUFD105172 – ThePictureKitchen / EUFD
EUFD002480 – TopFoto / EUFD & EUFD105172 – ThePictureKitchen / EUFD

M. Auguste Escoffier – creator of many signature dishes and the father of french cooking

For years M. Escoffier carried the fame of French cooking all over the world including England, the United States, Canada, Spain, Russia and Brazil – he personally served Napoleon III and once the ex-Kaiser was at a banquet which Escoffier had prepared. King Edward brought him to London and for many years he worked at the Savoy, the Ritz and the Carlton – photo shows the last picture of Auguste Escoffier at his villa at Monte Carlo, 12 February 1935.

On the right, you can see a portrait of Sarah Bernhardt by Manuel Orazi (1898-1934). The celebrity chef, at this time at the Savoy Hotel, created the dessert, fraises à la Sarah Bernhardt, in her honour which consists of strawberries with pineapple and Curaçao sorbet.

EUFD002470 – TopFoto / EUFD & EUFD101019 – ThePictureKitchen / EUFD
EUFD002470  & EUFD101019 – TopFoto / EUFD

Rita Hayworth, glamorous Columbia star and actress. 5 January 1947 & Margarita

Enrique Bastate Gutierrez claimed he invented the drink Margarita in Tijuana in the 1940s for Rita Hayworth. Hayworth’s real name was Margarita Cansino.

Margarita: 1 third Grand Marnier – 1 third tequila – 1 third freshly squeezed lime juice
Wet the rim of a cocktail glass with lime juice and dip into salt. Fill a tall shaker with ice. Add the lime juice, the Grand Marnier liqueur and the tequila. Add sugar to taste. Shake and pour into the glass. Garnish with a lime wedge.

EUFD002484 – TopFoto / EUFD & EUFD105118 – ThePictureKitchen / EUFD
EUFD002484 – TopFoto / EUFD & EUFD105118 – ThePictureKitchen / EUFD

Suzanne Reichenberg (1853-1924), French actress & Crêpe Suzette

Suzanne Reichenberg made her debut in 1868 in the role of Agnes at l’Ecole des femmes at the Comedie-Francaise. She was queen of the theatre ingenues from 1870 to 1900. The dessert Crêpe Suzette, Orange Liqueur Crepes, was named in honour of the French actress.

EUFD002484 – TopFoto / EUFD & EUFD105118 – ThePictureKitchen / EUFD
EUFD002484 – TopFoto / EUFD & EUFD105118 – ThePictureKitchen / EUFD

In the spirit of maintaining good relations through food, the Europeana Food and Drink project has combined a rich display of food and drink cultural heritage imagery, now available to license for publication. Much of the collection is on offer for the first time to publishers and illustrates the depth of local cuisine giving a new insight to the traditional EU dish as it has migrated and adapted across the world. From simple ingredients, cooking utensils, and baking techniques to complex dishes and the many characters that are involved in the food industry, the EU Food & Drink Picture Library (EUFD) illustrates food and drink history in photographs, artwork and objects.

The EU Food & Drink Picture Library is managed by the Europeana Food and Drink project partner TopFoto.co.uk. For further information, have a look at http://eufoodanddrink.eu/.

By John John Balean, TopFoto

Teaming up: Europeana Space & Europeana Food and Drink

The Europeana Food and Drink Project is very glad to announce a new partnership: We have teamed up with Europeana Space, another Best Practice Network within the Europeana Family. Under the common umbrella of Europeana and with several partners in common, joining forces is always important in order to foster synergies between sister projects.

Europeana Space aims to create new opportunities for employment and economic growth within the creative industries sector based on Europe’s rich digital cultural resources. It will provide an open environment for the development of applications and services based on digital cultural content. The use of this environment will be fostered by a vigorous, wide-ranging and sustainable programme of promotion, dissemination and replication of the Best Practices developed within the project. The extensive resources and networks of the Europeana Space consortium will be drawn on to ensure the success of the project.

Europeana-Space-poster

The cooperation agreement was just signed, and we are looking forward to work together even closer to engage creative industries and the food and drink community with Europeana.

From a still life to a 3D printed lamp: How to re-use Europeana content & win a contest

Interview with the Europeana Food and Drink Open Innovation Challenge winner : Gabriele Crivelli, Cretea

For the final Europeana Food and Drink Open Innovation Challenge, we asked creatives all over Europe to design a 2D or 3D product re-using food and drink related images or items within Europeana.

On 29th January 2016, the finalist of the competition has been announced and awarded in the 3rd Open Innovation Challenge Award Event taking place in Seville, Spain. We interviewed the winner of the 3D category, Gabriele Crivelli to explain the idea and creation process of his submission “MilleFori”, to us.

From a still life to
From  Still life with Saltcellar by Pieter Claesz to MilleFori by Gabriele Crivelli

1. First of all, congratulations again on your achievements and thank you for agreeing to be interviewed. To start off, could you please tell us something about yourself?

Thank you very much. I am a design engineer with a strong passion for creativity and mechanical engineering. In my daily working life, I work as a mechanical engineer in an industry that produces valve test benches, but in my free time I’m starting to express my artistic side with the creation of unique furnishing products coming from 3d printing.

2. How did you learn about the Open Innovation Challenge and what inspired you to participate?

I have learned about the competition through different groups of 3D printing on facebook where Digilab of The University La Sapienza in Roma had published information about.

3. Could you shortly introduce your product idea which led you directly to the winnings? Where did you get the idea from?

The product idea is born going to search different painting of still lifes on the Europeana site and focusing not so much on the shape of the element, but especially on the colors and patterns that can emerge from some details in the painting works.

Soon my attention was focused on the work Still life with Saltcellar of Pieter Claesz where in a glass I immediately saw a lamp.

With different drawings steps, the circular down pattern of the glass became quadrangular and took the top position becoming a technical distributor of light creating a luminous effect similar to the chromatic effect of the painting.

Some concepts until the final §D Project: The lamp "MilleFori" by Gabriele Crivelli, Cretea
Some concepts until the final 3D Project: The lamp “MilleFori” by Gabriele Crivelli, Cretea

4. In your submission video, one can see the creation process. Can you explain the technology you used to create it?

First of all I modelled the lamp with a 3D software, then with another software I sliced it. Finally I printed it with the 3D printing technology called: ColorJet Printing (CJP). This technology is an additive manufacturing technology which involves two major components: a special type of powder and a binder.  The powder is spread in thin layers over the build platform with a roller.  After each layer is spread, binder is selectively jetted from inkjet print heads over the powder layer, which causes the powder to solidify. The build platform lowers with every subsequent layer which is spread and printed, resulting a three-dimensional model of my lamp: MilleFori.

5. This competition was built around the re-use of digital content about food and drink. What do you think are the difficulties in finding appropriate content that would fit into your idea?

 At the beginning it is always good thing to have in mind one area of design where you want to operate, otherwise it is like looking into the sea. For example, I started my research with the goal of going to look for things or symbols that can could help me or inspire me in the design process of a lighting object.

6. What was the biggest challenge when entering the competition and what did you learn by facing it?

 The biggest challenge has been to try to create an object that would have evoked a feeling of warmth, like that I had observed in the glass of the painting. Then I gave a lot of importance to my object and its design process and not so much to the competition itself. I learned that a site such as Europeana is a good and fast way to find inspirations for a product.

7. How do you think creative thinkers can profit from using or sourcing content from Europeana?

I think that Europeana can reduce process design times and expand the horizons of inspiration to all creative thinkers.

8. Finally, how do you intend to follow-up this project and what is your plan for the winning product?

 From this experience I would like to start selling my products, unique and produced in limited series, through 3d printing technology. I hope that this victory will be a good advertisement for future satisfactions.

 

Thank you very much for the interview!

-by Angelika Leitner, Austrian National Library, with Gabriele Crivelli, Cretea

Studying cultural heritage: with chocolate, it’s better

“The greatest tragedies were written by the Greek Sophocles and English Shakespeare. Neither knew chocolate.”

Sandra Boynton

Giving away chocolate as a gift for Valentine’s Day has become a tradition throughout Europe and the world. But where does the sweet delicacy come from, how is it processed and what does it have to do with cultural heritage?

In our eLearning Resources, this topic has been explored by our Italian Partner Sapienza University in Rome. Public and private educational institutions, teachers and other educators can download the open resources, rich with digital cultural heritage objects found in Europeana or provided by partners in the Europeana Food and Drink project.

A pretty maid carrying drinking chocolate on a tray. Stipple Credit: Wellcome Library, London. Wellcome Images images@wellcome.ac.uk http://wellcomeimages.org A pretty maid carrying drinking chocolate on a tray. Stipple engraving by A. H. Payne after Liotard, c. 1743. 1743 By: Jean-Etienne Liotardafter: Albert Henry PaynePublished: -
A pretty maid carrying drinking chocolate on a tray

1743. The Wellcome Library, London. CC BY 4.0

Food is culture. Food and Drink can help in studying history, or in learning about a different culture; digital cultural heritage objects can be used to increase awareness about food and drink and healthy nutrition.

These interdisciplinary learning activities can be very effective for students, especially for children. Within Europeana Food and Drink, Sapienza University in Rome created a set of open educational resources cooperating with a commercial partner: “Antica Norba”, an old chocolate factory in Italy, near Rome. Antica Norba currently organizes school visits in its “Museo del cioccolato”; teachers participating in these school visits are interested in educational resources to support their activities. “Museo del cioccolato” is in Norma, in Via Capo dell’Acqua, 20.

 How Chocolate is made

How Chocolate is made” is a lesson plan, with information about lesson topic, learning target, educational methods, educative tools that will be used during the lesson, homeworks and assessments. It is rich of digital cultural heritage objects (images, videos) found in Europeana or provided by Museo del Cioccolato.

This lesson plan aims to make students pay more attention to what they eat: to think about the ingredients, how to understand them, and how they are processed to create industrial food products.

In the first part, students learn to read the labels and packaging of chocolate-based foods, with an emphasis on identifying the various ingredients. During this phase, they will be asked to bring to school the labels from chocolate-based products they often consume at home. They will take part in a team quiz, and will be able to discuss what they have learned by looking carefully at food labels. They will be given homework on this theme, with the aim of transferring the skills they have learned into their daily routines, involving their family members as well.

Molinet, used to mix hot chocolate and old kneading machine, Museo del Cioccolato
Molinet, used to mix hot chocolate and old kneading machine, Museo del Cioccolato

In the second phase, students will learn about the production process of chocolate, with reference also to its history: when it was first discovered, who consumed it in previous centuries, and the equipment used to produce it in both the past and the present.

Students who take part in educational trips to the Antica Norba Chocolate Museum will receive this information at the museum; their learning is supported by the various exhibits (see photogallery: exhibits at Museo del Cioccolato).

At the end of this section, students can participate in a quiz, organised into two groups. Hundreds of children participated in this quiz during the ChocoDay event in Norma (LT) on the 11th of October 2015.

Chocolate pot, Rijksmuseum, Public Domain and a sample question from the quiz
Chocolate pot, Rijksmuseum, Public Domain and a sample question from the quiz

The educational resources created by Sapienza University in Rome are distributed in Italian and English language. Everyone can download them; they are published under the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, so teachers and educators can also modify and redistribute it.

 

By Emmanuel Mazzucchi, Sapienza University Rome

Food and Drink Content Collection: Fánk, the Hungarian Doughnut

In our series “Collecting Content for Europeana Food and Drink” we let you have a look into the selection process of culinary objects for Europeana.

It is carnival season and we are in Hungary, where the Europeana Food and Drink project partner MKVM – Hungarian Museum of Trade and Tourism in Budapest has already introduced us to the traditions around „Farsang” and Krampampuli, the “drink of the devil”. For part 2, it’s getting even more delicious: With a local recipe for Fánk, the Hungarian Doughnut.

Fánk engraving, 1890s via MKVM
Fánk engraving, 1890s via MKVM

Fánk, the Hungarian Doughnut

The most popular pastry of the carneval season is the so called farsangi fánk. Fánk (Doughnut) is a pastry made of raised dough, which is then fried and frosted with powdered vanilla sugar before serving, but it can also be filled with jam or different kind of fruits.

The recipe has changed a lot through centuries, according to a cookbook written in 1896, fánk contained cream and butter as well, and the flour had to be held next to a heated oven for a night to be totally dry and warm.

Also in Austria and Germany, mainly Bavaria, this kind of pastry is enjoyed during carneval. Known as “Krapfen”, it is typically filled with apricot jam. It is said that the tradition of the rich delicacy goes back to medieval times, where it was eaten to save up for the following Lenting season. A legend says, that the name comes from the Viennese chef Cäcilie Krapf, who resurrected the recipe in 1690.

Hereby is a recent Hungarian recipe:

Special tool for frying fánk, 1930s
Special tool for frying fánk, 1930s via MKVM
Ingredients / 8 servings:

– 1kg flour
– 50g yeast
– 2 eggs
– 1 tablespoon of sugar to feed the yeast
– 0,5 l milk
– 100 ml sunflower oil
– 100g powdered sugar
– 250g jam

Preparation method:

  1. Measure the flour into a deep bowl.
  2. Sprinkle yeast into 100 ml milk, add sugar and let it grow until foamy.
  3. When the yeast is ready, mix it with the flour, and add 400 ml milk and 2 eggs to it.
  4. Knead it until the dough blisters and it is glossy and separates from the bowl.
  5. Sprinkle it with a bit of flour and let it rise until it doubles in size.
  6. When it is ready, turn out onto a well-floured bakeboard and roll it to a 2-centimeter thickness.
  7. Than cut pieces out with a floured doughnut cutter or a drinking glass. Let them rise in a warm place for about 45 minutes.
  8. Put oil in a heavy-bottomed pot. Make a try with a piece of dough, if it is fried, you can add the rest of the doughnuts into the oil. Slide them into the oil carefully upside down. (It’s important that the side that was touching the board should be up now.)
  9. Fry them for 2 minutes, if you were neat enough, doughnuts turn around by themselves. If not, turn them round with a spatula.
  10. Fry them for 2 minutes again. When they are ready, transfer them to a plate covered with paper towels.
  11. Serve them with powdered sugar or jam.

 

Enjoy and have a happy carnival!

 

By Julianna Kulich, MKVM and Angelika Leitner, ONB

Tasting Historical Europe – eCookbook Celebration in Vilnius

From Austria to Lithuania and back! Following the launch event for our eCookbook mid of January in Vienna, it was time to celebrate „Tasting Historical Europe – Exploring the culinary threads between Austria and Lithuania“ also in Lithuania.

On 25th of January, the Lithuanian capital Vilnius which is home to the Europeana Food and Drink project partner Vilnius University Faculty of Communication saw this second celebration for the eCookbook launch. Members from Lithuanian – Austrian community, also librarians and book lovers, as well as food bloggers and food fans gathered at the cozy coffee manufacture „Crooked nose & coffee stories“ based in downtown of Vilnius.

Professor Rimvydas Laužikas presenting eCookbook, Coffee Tasting from recipe by Anna Ciundziewicka, 1848
Professor Rimvydas Laužikas presenting eCookbook, Coffee Tasting from recipe by Anna Ciundziewicka, 1848

The evening started with an intriguing lecture given by one of the book authors professor Rimvydas Laužikas presenting not only authentic Lithuanian – Austrian dishes, but also a fascinating historic moments and interesting food stories that reflected to the common gastronomic history of two countries. It was followed by an engaging coffee education lesson, where the owner of the manufacture and a big coffee enthusiast Emanuelis Ryklys shared his knowledge about coffee preparation process, as well as its tastes and aromas.

“I don’t know how it [butter] affects the coffee, but I tasted it and it was amazing.” – Anna Ciundziewicka, 1848.

Finally, all event guest were invited to try an authentic coffee recipe published in the 19th century cookbook “The housekeeper of Lithuania” written by Anna Ciundziewicka and to experience the historic taste themselves!

Coffee education by Emanuelis Ryklys
Coffee education by Emanuelis Ryklys, Crooked nose & coffee stories

The eCookbook is a result of a joint effort between Europeana Food and Drink project partners Vilnius University Faculty of Communication and the Austrian National Library to reveal the invisible gastronomical threads forming European culinary heritage network.

Find out more and download the ebook here.

 

By Ingrida Vosyliute, Vilnius University Faculty of Communication

Tasting Historical Europe – eCookbook Launch in Vienna

This Tuesday, the Austrian-Lithuanian community met in the heart of Vienna to celebrate the launch of a special publication: The eCookbook “Tasting Historical Europe – Exploring the culinary threads between Austria and Lithuania” created by the Austrian National Library and Vilnius University – Faculty of Communication within the Europeana Food and Drink Project.

eCookbook Launch: Tasting Historical Europe- Exploring the culinary threads between Austria and Lithuania
eCookbook Launch: Reading by Prof. Wolfgang Klos, Austrian-Lithuanian Society.  Lithuanian roast goose with apples and sauce.

The book, which is available for free download, is dedicated to the historical gastronomic relations between Austria and Lithuania. It attempts to grasp the gastronomic contexts, including dishes that depict common gastronomic history.  Austrian recipes which were adopted in Lithuania and Lithuanian ones, which travelled to Austria have been selected using sources such as Europeana.

Seven Foodbloggers from Lithuania and Austria contributed to this culinary exploration of their countries. For the culinary reading, two traditional recipes from the book were specially prepared by the chefs of Dionysos-Nosh, the hosting restaurant for the evening. Guests could get a first glimpse of the eCookbook and learn about the invisible culinary threads  between the two countries – all of this framed by traditional Austrian and Lithuanian music.

collage2_TastingHistoricalEurope

Representatives of the Austrian – Lithuanian Society, University of Vienna, Verband Österreich – Nordische Länder or Kulinarisches Erbe Österreich could get inspired by the historic recipes and stories and were invited to share the eCookbook with their networks and communities.

Get inspired by Europes historical culinary heritage and download the book here.

All Partners Meeting in Malta

Europeana Food and Drink Plenary Meeting
Malta, 26th-27th November, 2015

This late autumn it was time for all project partners to meet up again: at the third Europeana Food and Drink Plenary Meeting. AcrossLimits from Malta, one of the Creative Industry Partner within the project, welcomed representatives from partner institutions across Europe to the very windy and stormy island, with two days of project updates, presentations, lively discussions and fruitful workshops ahead.

The evening before the plenary meeting, representatives of the Project Management Board took the opportunity to assemble and discuss current progress within the project, lead by the project coordinator from the London based Collections Trust.

Image Courtesy of Europeana Food and Drink
Image Courtesy of Europeana Food and Drink
Products, Content Base and Re-Use of Europeana Food and Drink Items

Opened by concise updates from each of the Work Package Leads and a question and answer session on day one, the product clusters presented the eight products and applications, created within the project: From the Tea Trail through London and the city’s Local Pubs in the Past and Present, to our Picture Library and AcrossLimits Food Planet, Delicious Cake Exhibitions and informative Educational Resources about chocolate, bread, traditional breakfast or food and farming in Ireland. These were rounded by a presentation of the Semantic Demonstrator and Technical Demonstrator, the professional applications developed within the project.

Work Package 2 Lead, Postscriptum, informed partners on all issues surrounding the currently growing content base on Europeana. Repeated applications, such as an eCookbook on the historic threads between the Austrian and Lithuanian Cuisine or the easy-to-reuse template for our food trail were introduced.

Image Courtesy of Europeana Food and Drink
Maltese Specialties and London’s culinary heritage. Image Courtesy of Europeana Food and Drink
Getting engaged with Food and Drink

Day two of the plenary meeting saw a hands-on approach in parallel sessions on communications, community engagement and a get-together for technical partners. Social media showcases from the Horniman Museum and already carried out project campaigns  provided a great inspiration for all partners to get further involved in promoting the aim of the project, the launched products and our Europeana Food and Drink content base on Europeana.

Also part of these two days was the involvement of Europeana Labs within the project and as a finale, a workshop on the upcoming Christmas season with our Europeana Food and Drink Advent Calendar #foodventcalendar.

Of course, there was lots of food involved as well: Thanks a lot to AcrossLimits and Collections Trust for hosting and organizing this third All Partners Meeting, getting a taste of the Maltese food and drink culture and giving a strong impetus to all participants for amplifying the projects aims.

 

By Angelika Leitner, Austrian National Library