Category Archives: Museums

National Historical Museum of Athens opening their collections for Europeana Food and Drink

After 30 months, the Europeana Food and Drink project is ending, but its impact should last some time longer: Following our new content providers campaign, we are proud to present one of the special new contributor, the Natonal Historical Museum in Athens.

We asked PostScriptum from Greece, partner and work package lead of the project, how this collaboration came about and how the National Historical Museum will contribute to Europeana Food and Drink.

How did you get in contact with the National Historical Museum?

PostScriptum (PS) maintains a long lasting cooperation with the Historical and Ethnological Society of Greece, owner of the  National Historical Museum in Athens and of its department, the Lazaros Koundouriotis Historic Mansion on the island of Hydra. PS implemented the project “National Historical Museum. Virtual Exhibitions and Educational Applications for Modern Greek History” under the NSRF and the Operational Programme Digital Convergence, which lasted from November 2013 to May 2015.  With the implementation of this project, the National Historical Museum was rendered capable of opening its collections to the public through the use of digital media. Collections were digitized, documented and uploaded to the well-known collection management system MuseumPlus, and then re-used for the production of various educational applications (virtual exhibitions, virtual tours, educational apps etc), available through the also upgraded internet site of the museum (www.nhmuseum.gr) and through the online Google Play Store and Apple App Store. The general aim of the project was to signal and put on track the new “digital openness” policy of the museum.

Following this successful collaboration, PostScriptum got in contact with the National Historical Museum in the context of the New Content Providers Campaign that was running. We thought it’s a cultural organization ready and mature to contribute to a project such as Europeana Food and Drink.  The project was an opportunity for the Museum to expand the horizons of its collections under a different perspective, increase their impact, promote the collections at a European and international level and make them available for re-use by other services.

collage_National HIstorical Museum Athens
Examples from the collections of the National Historical Museum

 Could you tell us more about the museum and their content highlights?

The Historical and Ethnological Society of Greece is a private, non-profit trustee foundation, dealing with modern Greek history. Being the oldest such institution in Greece (founded 1882), it is recognised by the State as of National Interest, and is housed in the Old Parliament Building, a historic landmark of Athens.

The National Historical Museum contains precious collections, such as Flags, Arms and Armour, Portraits and landscape Paintings, Costumes and Personal Possessions of historic persons. It also contains an important ethnographic department, as well as Archives of Historic Documents and Photo-archives of primary importance. Its Permanent display centers around the ideological revival leading to the Greek War of Independence of 1821, the war itself and the efforts all through the 19th and early 20th c. for political development and territorial expansion of the Modern Greek State. Temporary exhibitions deal with numbers of other issues, related to alternative aspects of the same periods (social and cultural issues etc), with other periods of time, up to today, or with commemorative anniversaries of highlight events. The museum also publishes an array of scientific and popularising editions on historical subjects, and organises cultural and scientific events and meetings.

Examples of
Examples from the Collections of the National Historical Museum

What kind of content will the National Historical Museum provide to Europeana?

The National Historical Museum has proposed to provide documented images of objects from its collections and of archival material. The aim is to highlight an aspect of the private life of historic persons, of habits and customs of their time, of political decisions relating to the production and consumption of comestibles, of the arts as applied on utensils of cooking and eating, and of their political implications.

Examples of such objects would be:

  • Decrees and official announcements on the cultivation of specific products
  • Pictures relating to the production of food and drink in traditional rural society
  • Furniture and food and drink utensils owned and used by historic persons
  • Romantic porcelain decorated with Greek subjects, created for the support of the Greek Independence movement.
  • Works of art depicting aspects of daily life relating to food and drink, or even related still life paintings.

Initially, the NHM is able to rapidly provide at least 50 items from this non-exhaustive list, with the understanding that the number may rise according to availability following research in the museum’s documentation system.

 

We are looking forward to see the these food and drink related images on Europeana, complementing near to 70,000  images which have been already made available through Europeana Food and Drink.

By Vasia Pierrou, PostScriptum and Angelika Leitner, Austrian National Library

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Final All Partners Meeting in Budapest

Europeana Food and Drink Plenary Meeting
Budapest, 6th-7th June, 2016
#EFDfinal

For the fourth and final Plenary Meeting, all partners of Europeana Food and Drink gathered in the heart of Europe, in Budapest.  The Hungarian Museum of Trade and Tourism (MKVM), culture sector partner within the project and also the only dedicated museum of travel and tourism in the world, welcomed participants with warm Hungarian hospitality and of course, culinary heritage and culture.

In the morning of 6th of June, representatives of the Project Management Board assembled to discuss final steps within the project and set the main focus for the two days: As the project officially terminates end of June 2016, a recap, lessons learned and ideas to maximise the legacy of the project, but also organisational matters were part of the agenda.

Europeana Food and Drink All Partners Meeting in Budapest - Image Courtesy of Europeana Food and Drink
Europeana Food and Drink All Partners Meeting in Budapest

More than 45 representatives of all partner institutions discussed key achievements, experiences but also any open tasks for the finalization and reporting of the project. It was  emphasized how personal relationships and advocacy as well as the community are important factors for bringing forward a project such as Europeana Food and Drink.

As a special guest, we were happy to welcome external collaborators from Greece: Maria Triantafyllou, Director of the National Interprofessional Organisation of Vine and Wine (EDOAO)  and Filippos Mazarakis-Ainian from the National Historical Museum of Greece shared their experiences working together with  Europeana Food and Drink.

collage_All Partners Meeting Budapest

Surrounding these two days of meeting, partners learned about the Hungarian food culture, both in theory and practice: The food and drink related exhibitions of MKVM and a great local dinner, topped by an evening boat trip on the Danube set the tone for a fruitful and positive meeting.

Thanks a lot to The Hungarian Museum of Trade and Tourism and Collections Trust, coordinator of the project, for hosting and organizing the final All Partners Meeting in Budapest.

By Angelika Leitner, Austrian National Library

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“Certamen Ovidianum Sulmonense” Contest: Translating Ovid’s work

Mid of April 2016, students from eight European countries and USA saw a very special challenge: Translating a passage of the famous epic poem “Metamorphoses”, with the theme of food and nutrition.

Parcite, mortales, dapibus temerare nefandis
corpora! sunt fruges, sunt deducentia ramos
pondere poma suo tumidaeque in vitibus uvae,
sunt herbae dulces, sunt quae mitescere flamma
mollirique queant; nec vobis lacteus umor
eripitur, nec mella thymi redolentia florem

 

“No, mortals,” he would say, “Do not permit
pollution of your bodies with such food,
for there are grain and good fruits which bear down
the branches by their weight, and ripened grapes
upon the vines, and herbs—those sweet by nature
and those which will grow tender and mellow with
a fire, and flowing milk is not denied,
nor honey, redolent of blossoming thyme.

P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses, Book 15, line 75-80

Within the framework of the “Certamen Ovidianum Sulmonense”, the international annual contest for the best translation of Ovid’s literary works, ICCU organised an event dedicated to Europeana Food and Drink.  The Central Institute for the Union Catalogue of Italian Libraries and for Bibliographic Information in Italy is one of the Culture Sector Partners within the project.

On Friday 15th April, 70 students arrived in Sulmona, Italy. They were challenged in the translation of a passage of the famous poem “Metamorphoses” by P. Ovidius Naso.

QR Code used during the city quest “Ovidie Quo Vadis” and The basket received as prize from each participant to the city quest
QR Code used during the city quest “Ovidie Quo Vadis” , Poster and the Europeana Food and Drink prize bag

Art, History and Food Heritage through Sulmona

The day after, Saturday 16th April, the students participated in the initiative “Ovidie Quo Vadis” organised by ICCU in cooperation with the Archeoclub of Sulmona. The aim of this initiative was to make known the rich artistic and historical heritage of Sulmona together with the local food and drink products of Valle Peligna. The participants used the app “CityQuest” developed by PACKED Expertisecentrum Digitaal Erfgoed Vzw within ATHENA plus European project. This fun activity allowed the participants to explore the attractions of this area in few time together with the local food. The local secondary school “Liceo Classico Ovidio”, the Archeoclub of Sulmona, and the Rotary club of Sulmona will maintain and distribute “Ovidie Quo Vadis” to the tourists in the next city events.

Each participant of the initiative received a bag containing postcards and bookmarks of the Europeana Food and Drink project and  local food specialties(pasta, sweets, creams, garlic, honey) and also olive oil soap provided by the local consortium of producers and dealers “Italia Autentica”. This end demonstrates how it is possible to join history, literature, art and wine and food heritage.

Stay tuned for the winning translation, which will be posted on our blog soon!

By Elisa Sciotti, ICCU

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Tell us what you see: annotating the Royal Museum for Central Africa’s collections on Historypin

The Royal Museum for Central Africa (RMCA) visited Historypin in London beginning of May to learn more about crowdsourcing and to discuss ways of engaging people with their priceless collection of food and drink related photographs taken in colonial Africa. This workshop was organised as part of the community engagement work in the Europeana Food and Drink project.


The RMCA is a respected cultural institution from Belgium, collecting material relating to Central Africa and providing a platform for current debate about Africa. Historypin is a website where communities and organisations can contribute their local and regional history.

Dieter and Joke at the Historypin headquarters, London. The market in Lusambo, from the Royal Museum of Central Africa’s collection
Dieter and Joke at the Historypin headquarters, London. The market in Lusambo, from the Royal Museum of Central Africa’s collection
Tell us what you see

Dieter and Joke from the RMCA met up with Lise from Historypin to talk about how they could showcase their great photographic collection to their audiences, as well as how they could use Historypin’s crowdsourcing tools to generate engagement and annotations.

As a result of the workshop, the RMCA will upload around 350 of their photographs from the Europeana Food and Drink content base to Historypin.org and ask their audiences to comment on the photo and describe the people, scenes and activities in it. These comments can then be pulled back to Europeana, as well as to RMCA’s own content management system, through Historypin’s API.  

An example of the comment section on Historypin.org, where users can contribute their descriptions of the photographs
Users can contribute their descriptions of the photos on Historypin.org

As Dieter said: “I would recommend uploading your collections to Historypin to everyone. It is a very easy way to get your collections out there where they can be seen. Being able to get your content enriched by your audiences on a nice looking platform is great, especially if you can then pull back these enrichments to your own database.”


The RMCA and Historypin will launch their crowdsourcing campaign in June 2016.

By Lise Schauer, Historypin

 

Cake, Heritage and Mother’s Day

This April 24th saw the yearly Heritage Day in Flanders, Belgium with the 2016 overall theme ‘Rituals’. Pretty ideal to connect this with the Cake exhibition! Cake goes along with a lot of rituals: think of blowing birthday candles, newlyweds cutting wedding cake together, and many others.

The Europeana Food and Drink touring exhibition Cake? Cake! , organized by the project partners Centre for Agrarian History and Royal Museums of Art and History is residing in Leuven, Belgium in Woonzorgcentrum Edouard Remy, a home for elderly people since April 22th.

The director of the Woonzorgcentrum was more than willing to co-operate and host a Heritage Day for his residents and all visitors.

“We wanted to work intergenerational, so we aimed at getting as many families with children to the home. A children’s play about cake  was organized and we developed an educational package to go with the cake exhibition. And we hired a photobooth. Big and small could dress up and pretend to eat a piece of cake. Everybody loved it. Wheelchairs aside, and getting up for five minutes to have that picture taken with son or daughter, grandchild or even greatgrandchild. And in the background: the campaign image of the Cake exhibition, the little baker”, Greet Draye from Centre for Agrarian History describes the atmosphere of the day.

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Heritage Day Leuven, 24th April 2016

Afterwards there was time for a real piece of cake. Speaking of which:  Mother’s Day is approaching. No better occasion to treat your mum with cake than that!

Cake for Mother’s Day

In Belgium the tradition of eating cake at Mother’s Day occurred for the first time in the fifties. And since mum was the one who used to bake cakes those days, a mother’s day cake was always to be bought at the baker’s. Mother’s day was – and still is – the high day for mothers and bakers.

Mother's Day Cakes, Bakkerijmuseum Veurne
Mother’s Day Cakes from Bakkerij Baelde, around 1950-1960, Bakkerijmuseum Veurne

By Greet Draye, Centre for Agrarian History and Angelika Leitner, Austrian National Library

Reuse of digital cultural heritage through the eyes of ‘traditional’ publishing

As part two of our blogpost series on the London Local Pubs: Past and Present ebook, Enrico Turrin of FEP is giving us some insight into ebooks and the reuse of digital cultural heritage through the eyes of ‘traditional’ publishing.

Publishing & Europe’s food and drink heritage

As the Federation of European Publishers (FEP), we got involved in the Europeana Food and Drink project as representatives of the book publishing sector, in order to contribute with our knowledge and experience about book publishing and to act as a contact with publishers from all over Europe. After all, one of the expected outcomes of the project was the publication of a book and an ebook!

At the same time, we thought the project would yield results that were interesting for publishers: a large library of high quality digital objects from many museums, archives and other cultural institutions across Europe, related to a trendy and fascinating topic like our food and drink culture, and available for commercial reuse.

The publication of the book London Local Pubs: Past and Present was the first, very tangible result of the collaboration of several project partners, and a good one, at that. Available in both print and digital, the book embodies the spirit of Europeana Food and Drink: it focuses on a traditional aspect of the food and (especially) drink culture, with an eye to history and one to modern times, using a wealth of beautiful images from past and present.

eBookpostFEP
Morris Dancers passing the Magpie & Stump; The Queen’s Head between 1930 and 1960
Book or eBook?

We think that these kinds of publications, on similar topics and with such interesting source materials, are very well suited for different formats, print and digital. On one hand, beautiful pictures make for nice illustrated books that figure well on your bookshelf or coffee table. On the other hand, the topic of food and drink is great for cookbooks and travel guides and many other publications that can be greatly enhanced by the features of digital books: easy to carry, enhanced, interactive, etc.

We are therefore promoting Europeana Food and Drink among our constituency, the book publishing sector, hoping to see this experience replicated many times. Besides regularly updating our members (28 national associations of book publishers from all over Europe), we have organised presentations about the project and its content base at the Frankfurt Book Fair with a dedicated area for the food and drink topic, called Gourmet Gallery and the London Book Fair just this week.

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Enrico Turrin, FEP at London Book Fair, 12th April 2016

To make sure that the content made available through Europeana Food and Drink can express its full potential in terms of commercial reuse, we recommend that it is made easily searchable, and made available at very clear conditions.

By Enrico Turrin, Federation of European Publishers

 

The London Local Pubs: Past and Present ebook has been published by Halsgrove Publishing as part of the Europeana Food and Drink project, with assistance from the National Brewery Heritage Trust, Historypin, Federation of European Publishers, Fratelli Alinari, Topfoto and Keepthinking.

Food for Thought: From Earl Grey to Beef Wellington

People are often remembered for their deeds, some are frozen in time by statues, remembered in a street name, or by the famous blue plaque that adorns many houses in Great Britain. There are a select few however that are immortalised in food and EUFD, the Europeana Food and Drink Picture Library, has matched up some famous foods from the picture library. This is the second part of our gallery of famous foods, from Napoleon’s Brandy to Crêpe Suzette and now to the British specialties.

The Right Honourable Charles Grey , 2nd Earl Grey ( 13 March 1764 – 17 July 1845 )

The Right Honourable Charles Grey was Prime Minister of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland from 22 November 1830 to 16 July 1834 . A member of the Whig Party , he backed significant reform of the British government and was among the primary architects of the Reform Act 1832 .

The 2nd Earl Grey famously gave his name to an aromatic blend of tea after he reputedly received a gift of tea flavoured with bergamot oil.

EUFD002485 – TopFoto / EUFD & EUFD0105250 – ThePictureKitchen / EUFD
EUFD002485 – TopFoto / EUFD & EUFD0105250 – ThePictureKitchen / EUFD

The 4th Earl of Sandwich 1718-1792

The sandwich is said to be named after 4th Earl of Sandwich after he frequently called for the easily handled food while entertaining friends.

EUFD002483 – TopFoto / EUFD & EUFD101529 – ThePictureKitchen / EUFD
EUFD002483 – TopFoto / EUFD & EUFD101529 – ThePictureKitchen / EUFD

Queen Victoria (1819 – 1901)

Many foods are named after Queen Victoria who reigned for 63 years. There are for example Victoria plums or as shown, a piece of Victoria sponge cake dusted with icing sugar and filled with strawberries and cream.

The pictures display Queen Victoria in in coronation dress 20 June 1837 and in 1887.

EUFD002475 – TopFoto / EUFD & EUFD105056 – ThePictureKitchen / EUFD
EUFD002475 – TopFoto / EUFD & EUFD105056 – ThePictureKitchen / EUFD
EUFD002471 – TopFoto / EUFD & EUFD101569 – ThePictureKitchen / EUFD
EUFD002471 – TopFoto / EUFD & EUFD101569 – ThePictureKitchen / EUFD

Portrait of the Duke of Wellington by Goya &  Beef Wellington

It is believed Beef Wellington was named after the Duke of Wellington, British hero of the Battle of Waterloo.

EUFD002476 & EUFD002477 – TopFoto / EUFD
EUFD002476 & EUFD002477 – TopFoto / EUFD

Arnold Bennett, English novelist (in 1931)

Omelette Arnold Bennett (bottom) which is an unfolded omelette with smoked haddock was invented at the Savoy Hotel and named after the English novelist who wrote a novel called Imperial Palace in 1930, based on his research at the hotel.

EUFD002488 & EUFD002487 – TopFoto / EUFD
EUFD002488 & EUFD002487 – TopFoto / EUFD

In the spirit of maintaining good relations through food, the Europeana Food and Drink project has combined a rich display of food and drink cultural heritage imagery, now available to license for publication. Much of the collection is on offer for the first time to publishers and illustrates the depth of local cuisine giving a new insight to the traditional EU dish as it has migrated and adapted across the world. From simple ingredients, cooking utensils, and baking techniques to complex dishes and the many characters that are involved in the food industry, the EU Food & Drink Picture Library (EUFD) illustrates food and drink history in photographs, artwork and objects.

The EU Food & Drink Picture Library is managed by the Europeana Food and Drink project partner TopFoto.co.uk. For further information, have a look at http://eufoodanddrink.eu/.

By John John Balean, TopFoto

 

Wine in Greece Engagement Event

On Friday 26th of February,  our Greek Europeana Food and Drink Partner PostScriptum organized an engagement event in the magnificent Domaine Oenotria Land Costa Lazaridis.

The event aimed at bringing together representatives from the world of culture, wine, tourism, media and creative industries in order to exchange, learn and use content related to food and drink and to create dialogue on prospects and potential partnerships that may arise on the occasion of the Europeana Food and Drink (EFD) project. collage_WineGreece

Cultural Heritage of Wine and the Attica Wine Trail

Mr. Kostas Konstantinidis, Managing Director of PostScriptum, welcomed the guests and set the context of the discussion. Mr. Markos Bolaris, Deputy Minister of Agriculture, delivered salutation and underlined the importance of initiatives such as the EFD project regarding the development of the economy and of synergies’ climate. Mrs Maria Triantafyllou, Director of the National Interprofessional Organisation of Vine and Wine (EDOAO) spoke for the benefits of such attempts of the wine industry.

Mr. Nikolaos Simos from NTUA presented Europeana and the NTUA participation in EFD project and PostScriptum and Mrs Alexandra Nikiforidou, presented the scope, the achievements and the impact of the project.

PostScriptum and Mrs. Vasia Pierrou introduced visitors of the evening to  the Attica Wine Trail which was created with material uploaded to Europeana in the context of EFD project. The applicaton was implemented with the contribution of wineries of Attica and the support of EDOAO.

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Europeana, Clio Muse and Big Olive

The presentation closed with the speeches of Mr. John Nikolopoulos from Clio Muse, winner at 1st Open Innovation Challenge of EFD, and Mr. John Zaras from Big Olive, who were referred to successful examples of cultural content exploitation. Mr. Nikolopoulos talked about the experience of Clio Muse in the contest and the business exhibits interface designed from various museums in Europe through the Europeana network with stories about food and drink, for which the app was awarded. Mr. John Zaras talked about the food and drink trails that Big Olive implements in the physical space and their connection with the cultural content and the EFD project.

The presentations were followed by a tour in the Wine Museum and of course food accompanied by fine wine, sponsorship of Domaine Lazaridis. Participants had the opportunity to learn further about the project, to know each other better and to discuss ideas for possible future collaborations and synergies.

 

By Vasia Pierrou, PostScriptum

Food For Thought: From Napoleon’s Brandy to Crêpe Suzette

People are often remembered for their deeds, some are frozen in time by statues, remembered in a street name, or by the famous blue plaque that adorns many houses in Great Britain. There are a select few however that are immortalised in food and EUFD, the Europeana Food and Drink Picture Library, has matched up some famous foods from the picture library.

Napoleon – ‘Napoleon Bonaparte’ by Laurent Dabos. (1761-1835)

Advertisement for Courvoisier cognac – the brandy of Napoleon. French distilleries named their best cognac Napoleon as a symbol of prestige and quality. Still used today Napoleon Brandy is known as XO, extra old, and designates a blend in which the youngest brandy is stored for at least six years.

EUFD002474 & EUFD002474 – TopFoto / EUFD
EUFD002474 & EUFD002474 – TopFoto / EUFD

ANNA PAVLOVA as The Dying Swan from SWAN LAKE in 1931 & Strawberry Pavlova

The meringue-based dessert, Pavlova, is named after the Russian ballerina Anna Pavlova. The dessert is believed to have been created in honour of the dancer either during or after one of her tours to Australia and New Zealand in the 1920s.

EUFD002473 – TopFoto / EUFD
EUFD002473  &  EUFD002479– TopFoto / EUFD

Dame Nellie Melba, GBE (19 May 1860 or 61 – 23 February 1931)

Born Helen Porter Mitchell, Dame Nelli Melba was a legendary Australian opera soprano and probably the most famous of all sopranos. She was the first Australian to achieve international recognition in the form of one of the first entertainers to become a DBE in 1918.

Peach Melba was created by Auguste Escoffier at the Savoy Hotel in London for Dame Nellie Melba who was living there for a time.

EUFD002468 & EUFD002478 – TopFoto / EUFD
EUFD002468 & EUFD002478 – TopFoto / EUFD

Canapes of melba toast topped with crab and crossed chives – Melba Toast -was created by Auguste Escoffier at the Savoy Hotel in London when Dame Nellie Melba had a bout of illness while she was living there. In the picture, the Opera singer is shown as Lakme, one of the many French roles in which she excelled.

EUFD002480 – TopFoto / EUFD & EUFD105172 – ThePictureKitchen / EUFD
EUFD002480 – TopFoto / EUFD & EUFD105172 – ThePictureKitchen / EUFD

M. Auguste Escoffier – creator of many signature dishes and the father of french cooking

For years M. Escoffier carried the fame of French cooking all over the world including England, the United States, Canada, Spain, Russia and Brazil – he personally served Napoleon III and once the ex-Kaiser was at a banquet which Escoffier had prepared. King Edward brought him to London and for many years he worked at the Savoy, the Ritz and the Carlton – photo shows the last picture of Auguste Escoffier at his villa at Monte Carlo, 12 February 1935.

On the right, you can see a portrait of Sarah Bernhardt by Manuel Orazi (1898-1934). The celebrity chef, at this time at the Savoy Hotel, created the dessert, fraises à la Sarah Bernhardt, in her honour which consists of strawberries with pineapple and Curaçao sorbet.

EUFD002470 – TopFoto / EUFD & EUFD101019 – ThePictureKitchen / EUFD
EUFD002470  & EUFD101019 – TopFoto / EUFD

Rita Hayworth, glamorous Columbia star and actress. 5 January 1947 & Margarita

Enrique Bastate Gutierrez claimed he invented the drink Margarita in Tijuana in the 1940s for Rita Hayworth. Hayworth’s real name was Margarita Cansino.

Margarita: 1 third Grand Marnier – 1 third tequila – 1 third freshly squeezed lime juice
Wet the rim of a cocktail glass with lime juice and dip into salt. Fill a tall shaker with ice. Add the lime juice, the Grand Marnier liqueur and the tequila. Add sugar to taste. Shake and pour into the glass. Garnish with a lime wedge.

EUFD002484 – TopFoto / EUFD & EUFD105118 – ThePictureKitchen / EUFD
EUFD002484 – TopFoto / EUFD & EUFD105118 – ThePictureKitchen / EUFD

Suzanne Reichenberg (1853-1924), French actress & Crêpe Suzette

Suzanne Reichenberg made her debut in 1868 in the role of Agnes at l’Ecole des femmes at the Comedie-Francaise. She was queen of the theatre ingenues from 1870 to 1900. The dessert Crêpe Suzette, Orange Liqueur Crepes, was named in honour of the French actress.

EUFD002484 – TopFoto / EUFD & EUFD105118 – ThePictureKitchen / EUFD
EUFD002484 – TopFoto / EUFD & EUFD105118 – ThePictureKitchen / EUFD

In the spirit of maintaining good relations through food, the Europeana Food and Drink project has combined a rich display of food and drink cultural heritage imagery, now available to license for publication. Much of the collection is on offer for the first time to publishers and illustrates the depth of local cuisine giving a new insight to the traditional EU dish as it has migrated and adapted across the world. From simple ingredients, cooking utensils, and baking techniques to complex dishes and the many characters that are involved in the food industry, the EU Food & Drink Picture Library (EUFD) illustrates food and drink history in photographs, artwork and objects.

The EU Food & Drink Picture Library is managed by the Europeana Food and Drink project partner TopFoto.co.uk. For further information, have a look at http://eufoodanddrink.eu/.

By John John Balean, TopFoto

Food and Drink Content Collection: Fánk, the Hungarian Doughnut

In our series “Collecting Content for Europeana Food and Drink” we let you have a look into the selection process of culinary objects for Europeana.

It is carnival season and we are in Hungary, where the Europeana Food and Drink project partner MKVM – Hungarian Museum of Trade and Tourism in Budapest has already introduced us to the traditions around „Farsang” and Krampampuli, the “drink of the devil”. For part 2, it’s getting even more delicious: With a local recipe for Fánk, the Hungarian Doughnut.

Fánk engraving, 1890s via MKVM
Fánk engraving, 1890s via MKVM

Fánk, the Hungarian Doughnut

The most popular pastry of the carneval season is the so called farsangi fánk. Fánk (Doughnut) is a pastry made of raised dough, which is then fried and frosted with powdered vanilla sugar before serving, but it can also be filled with jam or different kind of fruits.

The recipe has changed a lot through centuries, according to a cookbook written in 1896, fánk contained cream and butter as well, and the flour had to be held next to a heated oven for a night to be totally dry and warm.

Also in Austria and Germany, mainly Bavaria, this kind of pastry is enjoyed during carneval. Known as “Krapfen”, it is typically filled with apricot jam. It is said that the tradition of the rich delicacy goes back to medieval times, where it was eaten to save up for the following Lenting season. A legend says, that the name comes from the Viennese chef Cäcilie Krapf, who resurrected the recipe in 1690.

Hereby is a recent Hungarian recipe:

Special tool for frying fánk, 1930s
Special tool for frying fánk, 1930s via MKVM
Ingredients / 8 servings:

– 1kg flour
– 50g yeast
– 2 eggs
– 1 tablespoon of sugar to feed the yeast
– 0,5 l milk
– 100 ml sunflower oil
– 100g powdered sugar
– 250g jam

Preparation method:

  1. Measure the flour into a deep bowl.
  2. Sprinkle yeast into 100 ml milk, add sugar and let it grow until foamy.
  3. When the yeast is ready, mix it with the flour, and add 400 ml milk and 2 eggs to it.
  4. Knead it until the dough blisters and it is glossy and separates from the bowl.
  5. Sprinkle it with a bit of flour and let it rise until it doubles in size.
  6. When it is ready, turn out onto a well-floured bakeboard and roll it to a 2-centimeter thickness.
  7. Than cut pieces out with a floured doughnut cutter or a drinking glass. Let them rise in a warm place for about 45 minutes.
  8. Put oil in a heavy-bottomed pot. Make a try with a piece of dough, if it is fried, you can add the rest of the doughnuts into the oil. Slide them into the oil carefully upside down. (It’s important that the side that was touching the board should be up now.)
  9. Fry them for 2 minutes, if you were neat enough, doughnuts turn around by themselves. If not, turn them round with a spatula.
  10. Fry them for 2 minutes again. When they are ready, transfer them to a plate covered with paper towels.
  11. Serve them with powdered sugar or jam.

 

Enjoy and have a happy carnival!

 

By Julianna Kulich, MKVM and Angelika Leitner, ONB